Can you spot the Mars rover on this wild Red Planet landscape

first_img 0 Mars rovers NASA Space Enlarge ImageTry to spot the Mars rover in this view from orbit. NASA/JPL/University of Arizona NASA’s Curiosity rover loves to send selfies and close-up looks at fascinating rocks and even its own hole-y wheels. But sometimes it gets to pose for a portrait from far, far away. Conditions were just right at the end of May for NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft to capture a snapshot of Curiosity working away in an area called Woodland Bay, part of the intriguing “clay-bearing unit.” The enhanced-color image comes from the MRO’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera, which is operated by the University of Arizona in Tucson. If you’re having trouble spotting the rover, check out NASA’s cropped version of the image that highlights its location.hirisecuriosity2Enlarge ImageThat bluish spec is the Curiosity rover. NASA/JPL-Caltech A close look at the rover shows a bright spot in the upper left-hand corner. This is likely the rover’s “head,” which includes a suite of instruments on the end of a mast. The sun was hitting the rover just right. “Mirror-like reflections off smooth surfaces show up as especially bright spots in HiRISE images,” said NASA in a release on Friday. The clay-rich area Curiosity is exploring now is one of the big reasons NASA chose Curiosity’s landing site in Gale Crater. The rover is studying the history of water on Mars and looking for signs of microbial life, past or present. 41 weird objects seen on Mars, explained Spotting NASA machines on Mars is a bit of hobby for the MRO HiRISE team, which showed us both the InSight lander and the now-defunct Opportunity rover last year. Curiosity is NASA’s only working rover on Mars at the moment, but that’s scheduled to change when the Mars 2020 rover gets its own crack at the Red Planet in 2021. The MRO should be there to keep an eye on Mars’ new visitor. Post a comment Share your voicecenter_img 43 Photos Tags NASA rover sees bewitching night-shining clouds on Mars NASA spots Mars surprise at Curiosity rover work site Sci-Tech Marvelous Marslast_img read more

How Texas Troops Are Boosting FEMA Efforts In Puerto Rico

first_imgU.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr (Public domain)Texas has sent troops to assist FEMA with recovery efforts in Puerto Rico.Texas has sent over 12,000 troops, in addition to medical units and cargo planes, to assist FEMA with recovery efforts in Puerto Rico. The troops are being led by Lt. Gen. Jeffrey Buchanan, the Commander of U.S. Army North at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston.San Antonio Express-News reporter Sig Christenson embedded with Buchanan’s troops in Puerto Rico to bring news about these efforts to the mainland. Christenson said people in Puerto Rico are searching for water, soft drinks, and basic foodstuff.One of the troops’ main objectives was to fortify a dam in San Juan. Christenson says a big problem is that the water is at a high level and stressing the dam, because it rains almost every day.“As one of the engineers told me, you know, it’s a race against time,” Christenson said. “They had no guarantees on being able to hold the dam.”Another part of Buchanan’s mission is delivering supplies. “I’m told that the supplies are getting to people in the 78 municipalities, but there are lots of villages and places in the interior and the very mountainous interior that are very difficult to reach,” Christenson said.Christenson said there’s a distinct lack of communication right now in Puerto Rico.“Most people that we found in our reporting had no idea of how to even get in touch with FEMA on how to file a claim,” he said. “All of those are basic things that, if you are in Houston and you had a flooding incident, that you are going to end up having to file a claim and you are basically told where you can do it.”He said, “If so many people in Puerto Rico are having such a difficult time doing even something as simple as filing a claim, you can bet that things are going to be very, very difficult for a long time.” Sharelast_img read more