Wrangling Big Data for BtoB

first_imgWith big data comes big responsibility and as newer technology further enables information gathering, companies will need to utilize data-management techniques to grow their brands and extract streams of revenue.Here, Nick Cavnar [pictured], audience consultant for Nick Cavnar LLC and a featured panelist at FOLIO:’s MediaNext event on October 28 to 30 in New York, talks big data’s advantages and drawbacks and how b-to-b publishers can leverage collected data to drive content.FOLIO: There’s an enormous amount of data available to publishers, but is there too much? If you’re looking to better understand how your brands can thrive in a converged media landscape, register now for FOLIO: and min’s MediaNext event on October 28-30. Nick Cavnar: I don’t think it’s a question of too much or too little data. From what I see, most small to medium-size b-to-b publishers simply aren’t making effective use of whatever amount of data they have. Practically no one even has the ability to tie their web traffic data back to their registered subscriber database, to get a full picture of how individuals interact with all their content and advertising. At best, we’re tying together our various lists to get a little better audience profile. But we’re not using data to truly drive our content delivery or produce better leads for our advertisers.FOLIO: What’s driving the data craze and why has it become so important?Cavnar: Part of the craze comes from seeing how powerful data-driven communication can be. We all read accounts of how data was used to target voters in the last presidential election; we see Google using data to deliver targeted advertising; we know retailers are using data to determine which customers get which discounts and promotions.  We can all see that this is the future. But we’re struggling to find “big data” strategies that fit the reality of our small niche b-to-b markets.FOLIO: Where do you feel mid-market b-to-b publishers should focus their data collection and analysis efforts?Cavnar: Absolutely, b-to-b companies need to focus on identifying their web traffic.  We have good data on our audience when it comes to registrations—for magazines, email, events, or whatever. And we know how much traffic we drive to our sites through our email and other push communication to those registered users. But we lose sight of our audience once they get online.I also think we need to do a much better job of linking and identifying b-to-b audiences by company, and not just by broad industry demographics. Today’s business marketers want to target much more precisely—by specific companies or specific influencers within those companies. This requires tying more research and industry data directly to our audience databases.last_img read more

BarrettJackson just sold a 1997 Toyota Supra for 176000

first_img Toyota Share your voice 9:55 2020 Toyota Supra review: A solid sports car that’s rife with controversy Audi Toyota Classic Cars Car Culture 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon: Holy hell Comment 1 47 Photos The 4th generation Toyota Supra becomes a performance icon 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Tags The new Toyota Supra feels suspiciously like a BMW Z4 Now playing: Watch this: More From Roadshow Enlarge ImageThis black beauty set its new owner back a staggering $176,000 at auction. Barrett-Jackson People are Supra crazy right now. Specifically, they’re mad for the Mark IV car that was built in the 1990s and early 2000s and immortalized in The Fast and the Furious. Auction prices for these cars have been going through the roof, commanding prices once demanded almost exclusively by muscle cars or European classics. Now though, Supra prices might be headed even higher if the recent sale of a 1997 Anniversary Edition car by Barrett-Jackson is any indicator.How much did this Supra sell for? Well, hold onto your butt because it sold for $176,000 in a no-reserve auction. Just for some context, that car cost approximately $39,900 when new, which with inflation works out to around $63,664 today.So what was it that makes this particular Supra so unique that it would command a price similar to a base-model Audi R8? Rarity, for one. The Anniversary edition was only made in 1997. Next, this car has a targa roof (like the orange car in The Fast and the Furious), of which there were only 376 made in this car’s particular color. Next and maybe most importantly, it’s got a manual transmission.It’s also got low-ish miles – just under 70,000 on the clock — and is also a two-owner, almost totally stock car. That last bit is especially important since many of these cars were modified to the gills when their values weren’t so high.Barrett-Jackson didn’t respond to Roadshow’s request for comment.last_img read more

National museum to showcase rich silk heritage

first_imgTo Showcase the beautiful silk heritage, an exhibition titled ‘Mudmee: A Shared Silk Heritage’, will be organised by the Royal Thai embassy, New Delhi, in collaboration with the National Museum and Thai Khadi Research Institute, Thammasat University.The art show will feature around 50 pieces of old and new Mudmee silk from Thailand, and a few dresses and accessories made from Thai Mudmeesilk, along with a selection of Indian Ikat silk from the collection of the National Museum. It will be inaugurated by H E Chutintorn Gongsakdi, Ambassador of Thailand, and Dr B R Mani, Director General, National Museum, New Delhi on August 10 and will be on view till September 25. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThere will be a special lecture and gallery walk by Dr Anucha Thirakanont, Director of Thai Khadi Research Institute and curator of the exhibition at the opening evening. Entry is free on the opening evening whereas a museum ticket is required on other days.Thailand and India have shared a long history of textiles. Various types of textiles were imported from India to Siam for the local market and royal court use since Ayutthaya period (14th – 18th Century). including block-printed or painted cotton (chintz) from Masulipatnam, silk brocade from Banaras, and patola (double ikat silk) from Gujarat. Siamese had commissioned Indian-made textiles with Siamese royal patterns exclusively for the royal court, usually with the flame motifs, as seen in traditional Thai paintings and architecture. At the same time, textiles with simplified or mixed patterns of Indian taste were produced for the general Siamese public. These Indian-Thai patterns and motifs can still be seen in the Mudmee silk in Thailand today.last_img read more