Army Postpones Move to Downsize Brigade at JB ElmendorfRichardson

first_imgThe Army on Monday officially suspended the planned downsizing of the 4th Brigade Combat Team (BCT), 25th Infantry Division, citing a variety of global threats facing the nation.“The 4/25 is ready to rapidly deploy and conduct decisive operations in urban and mountainous environments,” explained Acting Secretary of the Army Patrick Murphy. “Given continued Russian aggression, the nuclear provocations of North Korea, and the continued threat from ISIL, we need this capability,” Murphy said.Converting the Army’s only airborne BCT in the Pacific theater into an infantry battalion task force would have resulted in the loss of about 2,600 personnel at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, where the 4th BCT is based. The realignment was announced last July as part of a restructuring intended to shrink the Army’s active-duty end strength from 490,000 to 450,000 soldiers.The decision to postpone the move is not surprising, as top Army officials in recent months had said they were considering it in light of the security environment. The delay represents a victory for Alaska’s congressional delegation, which had lobbied vigorously against the Army’s plan since it was announced in July, reported Alaska Dispatch News. Last month, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley told Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R), “It would be contrary to strategic national security interests to go ahead and pull out the 4/25 at this time. So my thought is that we should extend them at least a year to see how the strategic situation develops and then move from there.”  With the announcement, “the Army sent a strong message that America remains dedicated to our rebalance to the Asia-Pacific, understands our leading role in the Arctic, and is unyielding in our support for our critical alliances with Japan and South Korea,” according to a statement from Sen. Dan Sullivan (R).  Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

BarrettJackson just sold a 1997 Toyota Supra for 176000

first_img Toyota Share your voice 9:55 2020 Toyota Supra review: A solid sports car that’s rife with controversy Audi Toyota Classic Cars Car Culture 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon: Holy hell Comment 1 47 Photos The 4th generation Toyota Supra becomes a performance icon 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Tags The new Toyota Supra feels suspiciously like a BMW Z4 Now playing: Watch this: More From Roadshow Enlarge ImageThis black beauty set its new owner back a staggering $176,000 at auction. Barrett-Jackson People are Supra crazy right now. Specifically, they’re mad for the Mark IV car that was built in the 1990s and early 2000s and immortalized in The Fast and the Furious. Auction prices for these cars have been going through the roof, commanding prices once demanded almost exclusively by muscle cars or European classics. Now though, Supra prices might be headed even higher if the recent sale of a 1997 Anniversary Edition car by Barrett-Jackson is any indicator.How much did this Supra sell for? Well, hold onto your butt because it sold for $176,000 in a no-reserve auction. Just for some context, that car cost approximately $39,900 when new, which with inflation works out to around $63,664 today.So what was it that makes this particular Supra so unique that it would command a price similar to a base-model Audi R8? Rarity, for one. The Anniversary edition was only made in 1997. Next, this car has a targa roof (like the orange car in The Fast and the Furious), of which there were only 376 made in this car’s particular color. Next and maybe most importantly, it’s got a manual transmission.It’s also got low-ish miles – just under 70,000 on the clock — and is also a two-owner, almost totally stock car. That last bit is especially important since many of these cars were modified to the gills when their values weren’t so high.Barrett-Jackson didn’t respond to Roadshow’s request for comment.last_img read more

Kapil Sharma Show Kapil Sharmas new avatar Ustaad Medium Begam Ali Khan

first_imgTwitterThere is no dearth of humour and laughter on the Kapil Sharma Show. Right when we thought the show couldn’t get any better, Kapil Sharma is back to tickle our funny bones with his new avatar of Ustaad Medium Begam Ali Khan. Kapil shared a teaser of the same on his Instagram account and had us in splits. In a black pathani suit, Nehru jacket and red scarf wrapped around his arms and neck, Kapil totally justifies this new character of Ustaad Medium Begam Ali Khan.While sharing the video, Kapil wrote, “Hope u will like this new character “Ustaad medium begam ali khan” #thekapilsharmashow #tkss stay tuned.” While netizens hailed Kapil’s new look, rapper Badshah too could not stop himself from commenting on the post. He wrote, “Paaaji khatam character.” Kappu Sharma, Chappu Sharma and Rajesh Arora are some of the other roles and characters Kapil Sharma dons for his show.In last week’s episode of The Kapil Sharma Show, viewers were given a double treat in the form of Chinky Minky, the twin sisters, who have entered into the show as Kapil Sharma’s new neighbours. Chinky and Minky made a fantastic entrance and stole the show even with their short presence. Even Archana Puran Singh had given them a standing ovation for their brilliant performance on stage while talking in unison. And now, Kapil Sharma seems all set to surprise his audience with this new avatar.Kapil Sharma is going to become a father to his first child with his wife Ginni Chatrath who has entered into her second trimester. And now Kapil has decided to take a break from The Kapil Sharma Show to spend some quality time with Ginni before the baby comes into the world.last_img read more

Farhad Mazhar free to go home

first_imgPoet, writer and political analyst Farhad Mazhar on court premises on Tuesday. Photo: Saiful IslamPoet, writer and political analyst Farhad Mazhar has been permitted to return home.Dhaka metropolitan magistrate Ahsan Habib on Tuesday recorded his deposition and permitted him to return him on his own, with a Tk 10,000 undertaking.Farhad Mazhar left the court premises for his home around 5:52pm. Newsmen wanted to talk to him but he showed no interest in doing so.However, his wife, Farida Akhtar told Prothom Alo, “I’m happy with the fact that I have my husband back.”Earlier on the day, the police said Farhad Mazhar was blindfolded and picked up in a microbus.They added that this occurred on Monday morning when he had come down from his house and was on the way to buy some medicine.After being rescued last night, Farhad Mazhar was taken at nine this morning (Tuesday) first to the Adabar police station in Dhaka. From there, just before 11am, he was taken to the police Detective Branch (DB) office on Minto Road for interrogation.He was interrogated for over two hours. He was then sent to the lower court to record his deposition under Section 164.Joint commissioner of police Abdul Baten went on to say that after Farhad Mazhar was picked up, his phone was used to call his wife. Over the phone Farhad Mazhar had said that the people who had picked him up were demanding ransom of Tk 35,00,000.Farhad Mazhar was found at 11:30pm Monday night at Abhaynagar, from a Hanif Paribahan Dhaka-bound bus coming from Khulna, according to the police. The relatives said that some unknown person or persons had simply left him yesterday early morning in front of the Huq Garden house in the city’s Shyamoli area.Read more:‘Farhad Mazhar was blindfolded and picked up in a microbus’BNP’s allegations nothing but gibberish: ALFarhad abduction another ugly act of rulers: KhaledaGovt agencies involved in Farhad abduction: BNPFarhad Mazhar ‘abducted’ from residence: FamilyFarhad Mazhar rescued in JessoreFarhad Mazhar taken to DB headquarterslast_img read more

Myanmar closes Rohingya camps

first_imgMuslim residents at Taungpaw an internally displaced people`s camp walk through the flood to reach the new house built by the Myanmar government in central Rakhine. Photo: ReutersAs the world was focused on abortive efforts to begin repatriating hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees from Bangladesh to Myanmar last month, hundreds of their fellow Muslims still in Myanmar were boarding boats seeking to escape the country.Their attempted flight cast the spotlight back on 128,000 Rohingya and other displaced Muslims still living in crowded camps in Myanmar’s western state of Rakhine, six years after Buddhist mobs razed most of their homes.The government of Aung San Suu Kyi, under international pressure to address their plight, says it is now closing the camps on the grounds that doing so will help development and put the labour of camp residents to good use.But Reuters interviews with more than a dozen residents from five camps and internal United Nations documents show the move simply means building new, more permanent homes next to the camps – rather than allowing them to return to the areas from which they fled – leaving their situation little changed.Those that have moved into the new accommodation remain under the same severe movement restrictions as before, residents and staff working in the camps say. A network of official checkpoints and threats of violence by local Buddhists prevent Muslims from moving freely in Rakhine. As a result, those sources say, they are cut off from sources of livelihoods and most services, and reliant on humanitarian handouts.”Yes, we moved to new houses – it’s correct to say (the camp is closed),” said Kyaw Aye, a community leader from a camp called Nidin, in central Rakhine. “But we’ll never be able to stand on our own feet because we can’t go anywhere.”Reuters spoke to displaced Muslims in Rakhine by phone as reporters are denied independent access to the camps.Myanmar’s Minister of Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement Win Myat Aye said the government was working with the United Nations on a national strategy to close camps housing people forced out of their homes by violence in Rakhine and elsewhere, known as internally displaced persons or IDPs.There were no legal restrictions on the movements of displaced people in Rakhine, as long as they accepted a so-called national verification card that also gives them equal access to healthcare and education, he said in a written response to Reuters’ questions.Aid workers and Muslim residents say severe restrictions persist even on those who have accepted the identity card, which most Rohingya reject because they say it treats them as foreigners who have to prove their nationality.The U.N. chief in Myanmar, Knut Ostby, warned in a Sept. 24 private note that the government’s plan for camp closures “risks further entrenching segregation while denying IDPs many of their fundamental human rights”.Ostby’s office declined to comment on the note, but in a written response to Reuters’ questions said the UN had been invited to comment on the government’s plans for closing camps and was preparing its response.That response would include recommendations that all displaced people be granted freedom of movement, were involved in planning their resettlement and could return to their homes or another place of their choosing, Ostby said.MARITIME ESCAPERohingya community leaders say that improving conditions for those still living in Rakhine is one of the keys to persuading the hundreds of thousands sheltering in refugee camps in Bangladesh to return.Some 730,000 fled a military crackdown after attacks by Rohingya militants in August 2017. U.N.-mandated investigators have said the Myanmar military unleashed a campaign of killings, rape and arson with “genocidal intent”. Myanmar has denied almost all the accusations against its troops, who it says engaged in legitimate operations against terrorists.Refugees baulked at a plan for repatriating them that was supposed to begin in mid-November, arguing that conditions were not right for return.Meanwhile, at least three boats, each carrying scores of men, women and children, have departed from Rakhine for Malaysia since monsoon rains abated in October, following the hazardous maritime escape route used for years by Rohingya fleeing what they say is persecution in Myanmar.”If they are making the choice to go by boat, it’s clear proof of the conditions in the IDP camps,” said Khin Maung, a Rohingya youth activist in Bangladesh.He is in touch with fellow Muslims who are “living like prisoners” in the camps in central Rakhine, Khin Maung said. “If they are living like that how can we agree to go back?”Win Myat Aye, the minister, said Myanmar was working to improve the lives of both the IDPs and potential returnees.”I assume that the displaced people are leaving with boats because they (have) not fully understood what we arranged for their accommodations, livelihoods and socio-economic development,” he said.”INVESTING IN SEGREGATION”One camp, among the 18 remaining in Rakhine, lies outside a central Rakhine town of Myebon, which was torn by communal violence in 2012.The 3,000-strong Muslim community was expelled and put in the camp, known as Taungpaw, on a narrow strip between the now Buddhist-only town and the Bay of Bengal, in what was supposed to be a temporary arrangement.This year authorities built 200 new houses on rice paddies next to the camp, despite concerns that the area was prone to flooding. They were inundated in early June. In September, the government also built two new buildings set to become Muslim-only schoolhouses.”This is a sign the Rakhine state government is investing in permanent segregation rather than promoting integration,” said a previously unpublished memo dated Sept. 30 and circulated by U.N. officials setting out the concerns of aid workers operating in the camps. The U.N. said it did not comment on leaked documents.Some Muslims in Myebon have Myanmar citizenship and others have accepted national verification cards. They say they still cannot visit the town, where communal tensions have stayed high since the 2012 violence. Rakhine Buddhists have at times blocked aid deliveries to the camp.”Although they gave people new homes, if there’s still no freedom to move, there’s still no opportunity to do business,” said camp resident Cho Cho, 49.Aung Thar Kyaw, a leader among the Rakhine Buddhist community in Myebon, said the two communities were too different to live together, labelling Muslims “so aggressive”.”The government already built them new homes so they don’t need to enter town,” he said.Lei Lei Aye, an official in the Ministry of Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement, referred questions about the specific concerns in Taungpaw to Rakhine state government officials, who could not be reached for comment.”POLICY OF APARTHEID”Despite the humanitarian community’s efforts to convince Myanmar to change course, including by giving technical advice on camp closures, “the only scenario that is unfolding before our eyes is the implementation of a policy of apartheid with the permanent segregation of all Muslims, the vast majority of whom are stateless Rohingya, in central Rakhine,” said an internal “discussion note” prepared by the U.N.’s refugee agency in late September, first reported by Frontier Myanmar magazine and reviewed by Reuters.Win Myat Aye said he was “not concerned” about such warnings because the government was progressing with its camp closure strategy in consultation with UN agencies, non-governmental groups and foreign diplomats.The UN estimates humanitarian assistance in Rakhine will cost about $145 million next year.Former residents of Nidin, about 100 km (62 miles) north of Taungpaw, told Reuters their situation had barely improved since state media declared the camp closed in August.They are unable to return to Kyauktaw, the town where many lived and worked before the 2012 violence.Tun Wai, a Rakhine Buddhist doctor in Kyauktaw, said Muslims could “go freely outside the town”. But if they try to return, he said, “they will be killed”.Soe Lwin, deputy chief of the Kyauktaw police station, said Muslims “can’t enter the town”, but denied they would meet with violence. “We have the rule of law,” he said.The Muslims now live marooned among rice paddies that do not belong to them. Rohingya fishermen say what they catch barely covers their rental costs as they do not own their equipment.And with no clean water supply, children have contracted skin rashes from washing in agricultural run-off.”We can’t even support our children because we don’t have income,” said former camp resident Khin Hla, 43. “Without aid, we would starve.”last_img

Rethinking Water Detention And Development Regulations In Greater Houston

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Allison Lee/Houston Public MediaA view of Buffalo Bayou and the Houston skyline. Share X An influential group of policy analysts and researchers has released dual reports that show how water detention and drainage systems in the Houston region should be re-examined based on a more comprehensive analysis of watersheds, and how unchecked development continues to pose flood risks to the region.Houston Matters interviewed Christof Spieler, Project Manager for the Greater Houston Flood Mitigation Consortium, on Tuesday.Water detention regulations were first developed in Greater Houston in the 1980s, and Spieler said this new report shows how those regulations need to be updated based on new “computer technology that helps actually model and simulate runoff.” The water detention report found the old regulations overestimate the runoff from some undeveloped land, “thereby underestimating the detention required to maintain current conditions.”The regulations also use a one-size-fits-all approach for runoff, without accounting for the variety of soils and ecosystems found across the region. The researchers also found that the regulations limit the water runoff rate but not the volume. So as more development takes off in specific areas, the volume of runoff can lead to increased downstream flooding. “All of that put together means that new development upstream of existing neighborhoods,” said Spieler, “can still increase flooding in those neighborhoods even when the present regulations are applied.”One easy changeSpieler said one change that could be applied quickly would be raising the default requirement for detention, but also exercising flexibility so that developers could, in some cases, be able to show proof that so much detention isn’t necessary.Kyle Shelton, co-author of one of the reports and Director of Strategic partnerships at Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, said regulations should be designed on a regional scale with coordination between cities and counties, to determine what is appropriate land use and development.“If the starting point is how do we protect residents and how do we make sure people aren’t in harm’s way to the best ability that we can,” said Shelton, “we have to keep in mind that’s not always going to align with everyone’s economic goals and maybe even the overarching goals of the region.”You can read the report on water detention and drainage regulations here: 00:00 /10:38 You can read the report on development regulations here: Listenlast_img read more

Tablo Starts Testing Cloud DVR for Cord Cutters With New Device

first_imgNuvyyo, the maker of the Tablo DVR for cord cutters, is beginning to test a new cloud DVR service for over-the-air broadcast TV. The company is testing the new service with its newly-introduced Tablo Dual Lite, which began selling this week for around $140.Users who participate in the test will have their TV recordings automatically uploaded to remote servers operated by Tablo, from which they can be streamed on demand. As part of the test, Nuvyoo is giving eligible users 40 GB of remote storage for free.The new device is virtually identical with the revamped DVR the company introduced close to a year ago. With two tuners, it is capable of recording up to two programs at a time. As a networked DVR, it’s not mean to be plugged into your TV, but instead streams programming to mobile and TV connected devices; Tablo’s DVR app is available for a wide variety of such devices, including Apple TV, Roku and Fire TV. The main difference between the two models: Whereas last year’s version packs 64GB of on-board storage, the Dual Lite has to be equipped with external storage for DVR recordings. It’s also significantly cheaper: The 64GB version retails for $220, and continues to be available online as well as in some retail stores.Nuvyyo is just one of a number of companies trying to reinvent the DVR for cord cutters by allowing them to record over-the-air programming from broadcast networks like ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox without the need for a cable subscription. Other contenders include Plex and ChannelMaster, which recently introduced an Android TV-based DVR.Tablo customers do have to pay an additional subscription fee to make full use of the company’s programming guide, to the tune of $5 a month, or $50 per year. For now, the company isn’t charging users any additional fees for the use of its cloud DVR, with full pricing scheduled to be announced in the coming months. Popular on Variety center_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more