10 months agoAldridge convinced current Liverpool team best seen in 30 years

first_imgAldridge convinced current Liverpool team best seen in 30 yearsby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveJohn Aldridge says the current Liverpool team is the best seen in 30 years.Aldridge wrote for the Liverpool Echo: “This is the best Liverpool team since the title-winning side I played in back in 1987/88.”Over the past 30 years we’ve had some great teams but none of them have played consistently at the level we’re seeing from Jurgen Klopp ‘s side this season.”We famously went 29 games unbeaten from the start of the season en route to winning the title in 1988. I would absolutely love to see the current crop beat that record.”Can they do it? I don’t see any reason why not. They are 20 games unbeaten already and confidence is sky high after that 5-1 thrashing of Arsenal.”Going into 2019 seven points ahead of City is a great position to be in. Klopp and the players are saying all the right things about keeping their focus and not getting carried away.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

10 months agoSevilla ready bid for Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Sevilla ready bid for Chelsea striker Alvaro Morataby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSevilla are ready to bid for Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata.The Mirror says Sevilla sporting director Joaquin Caparros has sounded out Morata’s representatives and they are trying to persuade Chelsea to do a deal this month.The Spanish club are offering a loan deal worth £5m until the summer when they will pay £35m plus add-ons for the Spain international.Morata has become disillusioned at Chelsea after falling out of favour with Maurizio Sarri.But Chelsea are still reluctant to let Morata go without strengthening their own squad first. last_img

11 days agoMason slams Wales handling of James head injury

first_imgMason slams Wales handling of James head injuryby Paul Vegas11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveRyan Mason has slammed Wales’ handling of a head injury to Manchester United winger Daniel James in Sunday’s 1-1 draw with Croatia.James appeared to be unconscious after clashing with opponent Domagoj Vida, but was allowed to continue in the match.Former Spurs midfielder Mason suffered a career-ending concussion in 2018 and believes Wales were wrong to permit James to play on.”Daniel James was just knocked out unconscious! Yet three minutes later he has been allowed back onto the pitch,” Mason posted on his Twitter account.Both James and Wales coach Ryan Giggs denied the Manchester United winger was unconscious after the incident. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

ESPN Releases Game Times For 10 Opening Weekend Games

first_imgESPN College Football Playoff logo.ESPN ESPN AnnouncersESPNThe opening weekend for this year’s college football season, simply put, is going to be epic. Monday, ESPN/ABC released game times for 10 of the best matchups we’re going to see.South Carolina and Vanderbilt will kick things off on Thursday, September 1 at 8:00 PM ET, oddly enough in an SEC regular season tilt. Georgia Tech and Boston College will play in Dublin Ireland, at 7:30 AM ET on Saturday morning.Here are the rest of the games – including Oklahoma vs. Houston, LSU vs. Wisconsin, USC vs. Alabama, Clemson vs. Auburn, Notre Dame vs. Texas and Ole Miss vs. Florida State.9/1/2016: South Carolina at Vanderbilt on ESPN (8:00 PM ET) 9/3/2016: Georgia Tech vs. Boston College on ESPN2 (7:30 AM ET) 9/3/2016: Oklahoma vs. Houston on ABC (Noon ET) 9/3/2016: Hawaii at Michigan on ESPN (Noon ET) 9/3/2016: LSU vs. Wisconsin on ABC (3:30 PM ET) 9/3/2016: Georgia vs. North Carolina on ESPN (5:30 PM ET) 9/3/2016: USC vs. Alabama on ABC (8:00 PM ET) 9/3/2016: Clemson at Auburn on ESPN (9:00 PM ET) 9/4/2016: Notre Dame vs. Texas on ABC (7:30 PM ET) 9/5/2016: Ole Miss vs. Florida State on ESPN (8:00 PM ET)Which will you be watching?last_img read more

The Elders Welcome UN HighLevel Panel Report On Humanitarian Funding

first_imgThe Elders welcome the new report on humanitarian funding by the UN High-Level Panel, chaired by Kristalina Georgieva and HRH Sultan Nazrin Shah, as a timely and acute analysis of the global challenges in delivering aid to those in need.They wholeheartedly endorse the report’s assertions that “receiving lifesaving humanitarian aid is a right, and that providing it is a duty”, and that all actors must ensure their policies and decisions protect the “inviolable core humanitarian principles” of humanity, neutrality, independence and impartiality.The Elders agree with the report’s emphasis on “shrinking the need” for humanitarian assistance by a concerted resolve to end global conflicts, and by implementing credible policies to tackle climate change – widely acknowledged as one of the key drivers of natural disasters.If the international community can seriously work for peace in conflicts such as Syria, Ukraine, Iraq and Afghanistan, this would diminish the flow of refugees requiring humanitarian assistance. Equally, leaders must now honour the commitments made at the COP 21 climate summit in Paris in December 2015 and implement sustainable policies to tackle climate change.Kofi Annan, Chair of The Elders, said: “It is a challenge and an affront to our common humanity that 125 million people across the world require humanitarian assistance. This report is valuable for its clarity, its robust analysis and its clear moral message. The world’s prosperous nations need to show real ethical leadership to alleviate the suffering of the most vulnerable.”“The report contains important recommendations for governments, NGOs, aid agencies and the private sector, who must set aside rivalries and suspicions to forge an effective new consensus. I hope they will heed these messages and work together for the common good.”It is crucial that the recipients of humanitarian assistance are also included in the ongoing debate, so their voices are heard and their rights, dignity and agency are all respected.The Elders will do their utmost to support the aims and recommendations of this report, and share its hope that the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul will see leaders commit to its implementation.last_img read more

Rep Cole invites local residents to attend Coffee with Cole

first_img Tags: #SB, 105, coffee with cole, Cole, Office Hours Categories: Cole News,Featured news,News Lawmaker announces upcoming May and June office hoursState Representative Triston Cole invites residents of the 105th House District to meet with him locally during district office hours this spring to discuss important state and local issues of interest.“I want to get to know all the constituents in my area so that they know I am invested in the 105th District and I am adequately representing their needs and interests in Lansing,” said Rep. Cole, R-Mancelona.Rep. Cole will be available to meet with Northern Michigan residents on Friday, May 27, at Dairy Grille, 1111 Bridge St. in Charlevoix, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.The Mancelona lawmaker will also be hosting office hours at two separate locations on Friday, June 10, at Briley Township Hall, 11331 West St. in Atlanta, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and at Albert Township Hall, 4360 Hanson Ave. in Lewiston, from 2 to 3 p.m.Rep. Cole will also be available to speak with constituents on Monday, June 20, at Royal Farms, 10445 US-31 in Ellsworth, from 11 a.m. to Noon and at Northern Bear Country Store, 9918 Alba Highway in Elmira from 1 to 2 p.m. “Coffee with Cole” provides residents of Antrim, Charlevoix, Otsego, Montmorency and Oscoda counties opportunities to share ideas, concerns and issues regarding Michigan’s state agencies or legislation with Rep. Cole in person.Those unable to attend district office hours can contact the representative by email at TristonCole@house.mi.gov or by calling 1-(855)-DIST-105.######center_img 17May Rep. Cole invites local residents to attend ‘Coffee with Cole’last_img read more

New Cochrane review assesses efficacy of pyrethroidPBO nets for preventing malaria in

first_img Source:https://www.lstmed.ac.uk/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 29 2018Researchers from LSTM have confirmed that using pyrethroid-PBO treated nets to prevent malaria is more effective at killing mosquitoes in areas where there is a high level of resistance to pyrethroids.The distribution of nets treated with pyrethroid insecticides has been very effective in reducing malaria transmission during the past two decades in Africa. However, there has been a rise in the number of mosquitoes developing resistance to pyrethroids, which is the only class of insecticides currently used to treat nets.In a new Cochrane review, an independent team of review authors led by Katherine Gleave and Natalie Lissenden at LSTM assessed the efficacy of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) with added piperonyl butoxide (PBO). This chemical works by blocking an enzyme in the mosquito that prevents pyrethroids from working, to overcome the problem of insecticide resistance.Related StoriesEngineers crack the code to quickly diagnose anti-malarial drug resistanceScientists identify malaria’s Achilles’ heelGM fungus kills 99% of mosquitoes in Malaria-endemic region of AfricaLSTM’s Professor Hilary Ranson is senior author on the review. She said: “We have to find a way to maintain the efficacy of ITNs, which have been a cornerstone of vector control. While these nets are more expensive, the evidence shows that in areas where pyrethroid resistance is high, adding PBO to nets killed more mosquitoes, stopping them from feeding on people and probably reducing the levels of disease.”The review author team looked at results from 15 included studies that compared pyrethroid-PBO nets to standard pyrethroid nets, with one study measuring the impact on malaria infection in humans and the others looking at the impact on the mosquito population. The results show that while there is little or no difference in areas where resistance to pyrethroid is low or moderate, the nets had an impact where resistance was high. One trial carried out in an area at high levels of resistance also showed an important reduction in the number of people developing malaria illness. As ITNs are washed throughout their use, the review team also looked at the impact of washing these pyrethroid-PBO nets. While there was still a decrease in mosquito blood feeding success, the effect on mosquito mortality was not so marked when nets were washed multiple times, which would be important when considering community-level protection.Professor Ranson continued: “Researchers are working hard to reduce the impact of insecticide resistance, but our review is the first to look at ‘next generation nets’. While there is more research to be undertaken, we think that the results help show the value that these nets represent and supports the WHO’s recommendations for pyrethroid-PBO nets.” Jan Kolaczinski, Coordinator of Entomology and Vector Control at WHO’s Global Malaria Programme, supports this statement noting that “systematic reviews, such as the one on pyrethroid-PBO nets, provide a crucial underpinning of evidence-based WHO recommendations and guidelines. We greatly appreciate the important contribution to WHO’s work made by the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group in this area.”last_img read more

Key barriers that prevent access to antibiotics in low and middleincome countries

first_img Encourage research and development of new or improved antibiotics, diagnostic tests, vaccines, and alternatives to antibiotics for bacterial infections, Support the registration of antibiotics in more countries according to clinical need, Develop and implement national treatment guidelines for the use of antimicrobials, Explore innovative funding for essential antibiotics, Ensure the quality of antibiotics and strengthen pharmaceutical regulatory capacity, and Encourage local manufacturing for cost-effective antibiotics. Source: https://cddep.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 9 2019Antibiotic resistance is an emerging global public health threat spurred by the overuse and misuse of antibiotics. While “overuse” of antibiotics is widely accepted as a major health challenge, it is less well known that many people in low- and middle-income countries continue to die because they lack access to antibiotics. The majority of the world’s annual 5.7 million antibiotic-treatable deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries where the mortality burden from treatable bacterial infections far exceeds the estimated annual 700,000 deaths from antibiotic-resistant infections.In a new report, titled “Access Barriers to Antibiotics” (available upon request and online at http://www.cddep.org beginning April 11, 2019) researchers at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) conducted stakeholder interviews in Uganda, India, and Germany, and literature reviews to identify key access barriers to antibiotics in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. The report makes several recommendations proposing action on R&D (new antibiotics and rapid diagnostic tests), strengthening regulatory capacities, encouraging the development and diversification of quality local manufacturing, exploring innovative funding to reduce out-of-pocket payments, better treatment guidelines, and awareness raising.”Lack of access to antibiotics kills more people currently than does antibiotic resistance, but we have not had a good handle on why these barriers are created,” said Dr. Ramanan Laxminarayan, CDDEP director and a co-author of the report. The findings of the report show that even after the discovery of a new antibiotic, regulatory hurdles and substandard health facilities delay or altogether prevent widespread market entry and drug availability,” explains Dr. Laxminarayan. “Our research shows that of 21 new antibiotics entering markets between 1999 and 2014, less than five were registered in most countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Just the mere existence of an effective antibiotic does not mean that they are available in countries where they are most needed.”Health facilities in many low- and middle-income countries are substandard and lack staff who are properly trained in administering antibiotics. In Uganda, 10 to 54 percent of health staff posts are unfilled because of poor pay, high stress, lack of resources, and poor management. Staffing on wards is inadequate to administer medicines, patients miss antibiotic doses, and public nurses sometimes request compensation for administering medicines. In India, there is one government doctor for every 10,189 people (the World Health Organization [WHO] recommends a ratio of 1:1,000), or a deficit of 600,000 doctors, and the nurse:patient ratio is 1:483, implying a shortage of 2 million nurses.In low- and middle-income countries, weak drug supply chains fail to make antibiotics consistently available. In Uganda, researchers found that many products were stored and transported long distances without cold-chain temperature control, and only 47 percent of medicines on the WHO’s Essential Medicines List were procured through the centralized authority, resulting in chronic shortages. Moreover, public-private supply chain delivery systems were not leveraged to improve drug availability outside specific programs.Related StoriesTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTApplication of machine learning methods to healthcare outcomes researchAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyLack of oversight and regulation in the drug manufacturing and supply chain leads to poor drug quality and falsified medicines; 17 percent of the substandard or falsified medicines reported to the WHO are antibiotics, and each year, more than 169,000 childhood pneumonia deaths are caused by falsified antibiotics, researchers reported.Even when antibiotics are available, patients are often unable to afford them. High out-of-pocket medical costs to the patient are compounded by limited government spending for health services. In Uganda, where just 8.9 percent of the national budget goes to health services, 41 percent of health expenditure is out-of-pocket, and 23 percent of households spend more than 10 percent of their income on healthcare. Moreover, limited government spending results in drug shortages in public health facilities which forces patients to go to private pharmacies or drugstores to buy medicines that should be provided free. In India, 65 percent of health expenditure is out-of-pocket, versus 13 percent in Germany, and such expenditures push some 57 million people into poverty each year in India alone.Worldwide, the irrational use of antibiotics and poor antimicrobial stewardship lead to treatment failure and propagate the spread of drug resistance which, in turn, further narrows the available array of effective antibiotics. Finally, research and development for new antimicrobials, vaccines, and diagnostic tests has slowed since the 1960s as profitable investment in this area is limited by low sales volumes, short duration of treatment, competition with established products and cheaper generics, and the possibility that resistance will rapidly emerge.National governments, policymakers, pharmaceutical companies, public and private healthcare institutions, and international public health bodies all have a role to play in improving access to antibiotics worldwide. While interventions to improve access must take into account differences among countries, the researchers provided the following recommendations to address key barriers and improve access to antibiotics:last_img read more

Sheshnag in trouble as Brahmaputra water hisses over danger mark in Guwahati

first_img Next India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 21:37 IST Water has reached near the feet of the statue of Lord Vishnu. (Photo: ANI)A statue of Vishnu sitting on Sheshnag seems to be in danger. The statue is placed on a vertical pillar in the Brahmaputra river. The statue seemed to be on the verge of drowning as the water level crossed the danger mark following rainfall in the region. In a picture, the water is seen to have reached the feet of the statue on the pillar in the river near Chakreshwar temple in Kalipur.The impact of an increase in the water level of the Brahmaputra river was also seen in Morigaon district in Assam. In Tengaguri area of Morigaon, a building of a primary school collapsed due to the rising water level in the Brahmaputra river. The incident was captured on camera.The flood situation in Assam continued to worsen as new areas flooded on Saturday. The Assam State Disaster Management Authority (ASDMA) has said that 25 districts of the state are under water. One person died in a flood-related incident in Dhemaji in the last 24 hours taking the death toll to seven due to floods and landslides.According to the ASDMA, a total of 1,405,711 people have been affected by the deluge in 25 districts. “Over 20,000 people are living in 234 relief camps opened by the district administration,” an official of the ASDMA said on Saturday while adding that 51,722 hectares of agricultural land have also been submerged so far affecting the farmers.The affected districts include Dhemaji, Lakhimpur, Barpeta, Morigaon, Biswanath, Sonitpur, Darrang, Goalpara, Nagaon, Golaghat, Jorhat, Sivasagar, Dibrugarh and Tinsukia, the ASDMA said.The flood situation in Dhemaji and Lakhimpur remained the worst where most of the people have been affected. Several houses, roads and bridges have also been damaged after the breach of embankments that have led to flooding in many areas.The water level in Kaziranga National Park, spread over the floodplains of the Brahmaputra river, also increased following incessant rains. Sailen Pande, PRO of Assam Forest and Environment Minister, said, “This year, Ministry of Forest and Environment, Assam had taken precautions to deal with the flood.””Over 70 per cent of the park has been submerged with flood waters. All staffs have been put on alert to deal with the flood,” Sailen Pande said.Barpeta is the worst hit with 5.22 lakh people affected, followed by 1.38 lakh in Dhemaji and 95,000 in Morigaon, ASDMA said.Also Read | Bihar fears floods as heavy rains swell riversAlso Read | 2 dead, 390 houses submerged in Mizoram floodAlso Watch | In Depth: Decoding the link between floods and droughtsFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byChanchal Chauhan Assam floods: Sheshnag in trouble as Brahmaputra water hisses over danger mark in GuwahatiThe statue seemed to be on the verge of drowning as the water level crossed the danger mark following rainfall in the region.advertisementlast_img read more