On-farm cooperation facilitating OSC research and marketing efforts

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The research efforts of Ohio agriculture certainly include lab testing, university plot work and data analysis, but every farmer knows that the most dependable crop production research also includes extensive work in real, on-farm fields.The real world of crop production simply cannot be duplicated in a lab. For this reason, farmer cooperators with various agricultural research projects are absolutely essential in developing relevant conclusions and solutions for challenges on farms. And, it just so happens, that some of those farmer cooperators are the same ones making decisions about which research projects should be funded by Ohio Soybean Council (OSC) checkoff dollars at the state and national levels. Dan Corcoran, Pike County farmer, OSC and United Soybean Board memberWith its misty mornings, rolling hills and steamy river bottoms, the Corcoran farm faces perennial disease challenges — a nightmare for farm management but a dream come true for plant pathologists like Dr. Anne Dorrance with Ohio State University Extension.“In southern Ohio we have a blessing and curse that it gets foggy most every morning. That allows us to get some moisture in here when it is dry but we also get more disease issues. We run into disease pressure from the time we plant the seed through harvest,” Corcoran said. “Anne likes to evaluate what is going on in these fields so we can learn more about how to grow better soybeans. Whenever Anne comes down here she gets a big smile on her face because of the disease levels we have. Our disease is good for her and bad for me.”As much as he does not appreciate the disease problems, Corcoran does recognize the value of this kind of research both for his farm and the farms of other Ohio soybean farmers.“Her research looks at some unique disease scenarios which will provide important information to farmers in the region. We hear from a lot of companies selling fungicides alerting us to problems, but with this university work we can get unbiased, real data on what works and what does not,” he said. “Anne has put out plots for three or four years. We have graduate students doing studies out here from the time we plant through harvest. They get an idea of the plant cycle and disease problems. They can also get an early start on finding disease here. Then, Anne has the ability to work with many people in the state and around the country. Through that collaboration, those researchers are looking at multiple things to help us as producers better manage things to produce a better crop.”Learning from the research taking place on his farm, Corcoran has modified his management techniques to improve profitability.“Because we have these plots, we talk about putting fungicide on a little earlier. The plot work has really helped us evaluate fungicides. We have learned that it is tough to make fungicides pay on soybeans. We use genetic selection to get good disease resistance,” he said. “Charcoal rot is more prevalent in southern Ohio. You need high temperatures and in some years we are seeing it on our sandy soils. We start see plants start to wither. They go from beautiful green to dying out just like that. It is a grey fungus that grows up the stem and takes over the whole plant. Those zero yields really hurt your average.“We are also watching frogeye leaf spot closely this year. We occasionally see it really affecting the perimeter and we will hit the outsides of fields when it gets bad, especially in seed beans that we grow. We like to do test strips every year. We will try different timing of spraying, with and without insecticides. The soybeans do look pretty when you spray them but it doesn’t always show up in the yield. The later it gets in the season, the less likely we are to spray.” Terry McClure, Paulding County, OSC Board memberThere are few issues more pressing in Ohio agriculture than the countless questionsTerry McClureregarding water quality. McClure has opened up his farm to researchers to get some answers through on-farm, edge-of-field testing with water collection stations for surface and tile runoff.“You have to take time to do these kinds of things. There is nothing wrong with farmers taking a little time to try to learn more about what is happening in our fields,” McClure said. “This really started several years ago with a presentation from Kevin Elder from the Ohio Department of Agriculture about these water quality problems we were seeing. He kept saying, ‘We don’t know.’ That got to be unacceptable. For agriculture, not knowing is not an answer. Since then, it has really turned out to be a much bigger thing than anybody thought it would be.”The sampling equipment for the water collection sites around the state costs $1 million and it costs another $500,000 a year to collect the samples. The funding efforts got started with OSC, Ohio Corn Marketing Program and the Ohio Small Grains Marketing Program in an effort to gather information to help farmers better manage phosphorus (P) on their farms to improve economics and water quality.The project is still ongoing, but McClure said there are some clear lessons already coming from the data collected.“There are some early things the researchers have learned that have become obvious. If you apply P right ahead of a storm, it moves off the field. Some of this is about cementing the things we thought we knew. Small grains make a difference in the whole crop rotation and cover crops do too. I don’t think we have enough data to understand the placement and some of the smaller details yet but we need to learn more by trying different practices. This will give us clues about the many small changes of how we do the 4Rs,” McClure said. “We have made some changes already on our farm. Historically we would apply all of our P and K as a wheat starter for our full rotation. We have started breaking up our phosphate applications. We have continued to use cover crops as much as we can. Oats after wheat really works for us and we have been seeing some really nice things with the cereal rye.“I have been surprised at the interest that farmers have in this knowledge and the understanding that can be generated by this. They want to know if the things they’re being asked to do are really making a difference.”McClure said the information gathered from this year’s extreme weather pattern should be particularly interesting.“This year has been unprecedented. Since planting in the middle of April we have had just shy of 40 inches of rain,” McClure said on July 21. “It will be interesting to see what dynamics there are coming out of that kind of water flow. We have to have had more particulate matter loss with this. I think we will be able to learn a lot from this challenge. Who would have ever plugged this weather event into a model? This has to be a one in 200 kind of year. This is real.” Keith Kemp, Preble County farmer, OSC and United Soybean Board memberWhen it comes to improving Ohio soybean production, there is no better place than on-farm soybean fields to study management practices.Keith Kemp“There is tremendous value to doing things on Ohio farms for Ohio’s farmers. It gives us an edge because we have the research right here,” Kemp said. “ It is so valuable to do this on Ohio farms rather than through national projects. We are getting good results that can really be used in Ohio to make our soybean industry more profitable.”Plots on Kemp’s farm are set up for a wide variety of research projects.“Laura Lindsey from The Ohio State University and her team of researchers are looking at fungicides, insecticides, seed treatments, some biologicals, and they looked at gypsum last year. They are doing the fertility work with Steve Culman in the same plot and they have non-GMO varieties over there too,” Kemp said. “The plot is between four or five acres. Their plot work is very small, but they can get quite a bit of good information from that. It is fun to watch the plots grow and keep an eye on what is happening. Some things work and some things don’t and that is what we want to see.”Having the plots on the farm is convenient and of real interest for Kemp.“They do everything for the plots. All we do is supply the ground. They have their own planter and they harvest and put the beans in our truck,” Kemp said. “It is really valuable for us to see the new things out there and the end results. There are more plots than just here so you have some comparison from other parts of the state. You can see how the varieties perform out here, which is nice. These plots are so valuable because you have a third party out here doing this research and not a company.”And, with his perspective of the checkoff funding decisions at both the state and national levels, Kemp sees how these Ohio efforts can be leveraged with national funding.“It is nice that we have this data to take to the national level as well. The more of this kind of research we do, the more funding we can get from the national level,” he said. “That helps build the research infrastructure in our state. I am excited with where OSU Extension is now. We have some top caliber researchers for soybeans in Ohio. There is tremendous work being done and it ends up making soybean farmers more profitable. We are investing for our future with this.” Dale Profit, Van Wert County farmer, OSC and United Soybean Board memberDale ProfitMore of the world, most notably South America, is figuring out how to efficiently produce soybeans in a cost-effective manner. Rather than watching as the competitive advantage of soybean growers in the United States erodes away to foreign competitors, Profit is doing something about it.“We’ve all recognized that we are all in a worldwide situation raising soybeans. In the future, South America will probably be able to raise soybeans with less expense than we can. We have to look for a niche or a product that adds value to our soybeans and we need to start adapting to this philosophy,” he said. “Not all of us will be raising commodity beans in the future. There will still be commodity beans out there but there will also be some opportunities for the high oleic soybeans and other things that are in the development stage at the present time.”High oleic soybean varieties, including Plenish from DuPont Pioneer and Vistive Gold from Monsanto, offer farmers a unique opportunity to regain soybean oil market share they lost because of trans-fat labeling. Food customers have been clear that they would like to use soybean oil, but they need new properties that offer health advantages over products with trans-fats. To prove that they can meet the potential demand, farmers need to show that they can provide a consistent supply of high oleic oil.“A few years ago, we had been raising seed soybeans for DuPont Pioneer and I asked them if they were going to handle Plenish and they said, ‘yes.’ I asked to be on the list. They called me up when they were asking for acres and that is how I got started,” Profit said. “We have always looked at opportunities and once in a while they come up short but if you aren’t looking for opportunities they pass you by. It is always best if you are on the front end of an opportunity. We generally raise three different varieties of Plenish — medium, short and longer season. They have always been right in the middle of our production for three years now and there has not been a spread of very many bushels in between. We think they are very competitive and we are happy with what they are doing for us.”Profit sees high oleic soybeans as a potential solution to the competitive challenges of the future for Ohio soybean farmers.“Farmers are primarily interested in yield. If varieties are developed with traits that yield they will be adopted fairly quickly,” said. “As long as the yield is there and there is some premium, we can use those opportunities to increase or maintain our income.” Bill Bayliss, Logan County farmer, OSC Board memberWhile efforts in growing soybeans more efficiently and profitably are crucial moving forward, there is no point in growing them if they cannot be marketed at a profitable price. With this in mind, Ohio’s soybean farmers are regularly working to connect the buyers of Ohio soybeans with Ohio farms.“We are not only looking at how to increase yields but also how to move forward in the marketing area. We are looking at who our best customers are, what they want and how we can adjust and adapt what we are doing to better serve them,” Bayliss said. “The Asian customers are our biggest food grade customers. We have found that they really value face-to-face conversations. They want to see the actual farmers they are doing business with. That is important to them.”With this in mind, there have been stepped up efforts in recent years to get Ohio’s soybean farmers over to meet their Asian customers in person, and to bring those customers to Ohio soybean farms. These encounters serve to build important relationships and also provide clues about how to better serve purchasers of Ohio soybeans.“The different countries in Asia have different opinions on genetically modified crops. Some are very interested in GMO-free soybeans but others are not really concerned if they are GMO or not,” Bayliss said. “Ohio farmers are lucky because we have soil types and a climate that creates a particular texture for the food grade soybeans that is preferred by the Asian customers.”It is also important to consider the needs of domestic customers.“High oleic soybeans are one of our premier factors in marketing because of their ability to improve the health of fried foods,” Bayliss said. “We are really working extensively to better serve the people who are buying our soybeans and soy products because that is what will ultimately pay off down the road.”For much more on the soybean checkoff, visit the Soybean Rewards web page at http://www.soyohio.org/council/for-ohio-farmers/soybean-rewards/.last_img read more

Fall soil sampling?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The goal of a soil sample is to make a fertilizer recommendation for crop production.To provide that recommendation, calibration studies are done to measure crop response.For Ohio, the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations provide the calibration study history for recommendation development.While there are other “recommendations” used in Ohio, few have done the comprehensive work to truly provide this information.For more information on the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations or on developing a soil sampling strategy several references are provided at http://agcrops.osu.edu/specialists/fertility/fertility-fact-sheets-and-bulletins.Sample areas in the field that have similar crop yields, crop rotation histories, fertilizer application methods and sources of applied nutrient. Fields or field areas with a history of livestock production (a former pasture, had manure applications or produced hay) or other unique characteristics may require a different sampling strategy. Field areas represented by any single sample should be less than 25 acres. Use of a yield monitor or grid sampling can lead to development of crop management zones, easing the burden of future sampling.Understand that a single soil sample is not a single core but a composite of numerous cores collected over the field area represented by the sample.Where broadcast applications have occurred a composite sample of 10 to 15 cores is suggested.Where a history of banded application exist in a field or manure application, then increase the number of cores to 20 to 25. In my opinion every field in Ohio has had band applications at some time in the past, so use 20 to 25 cores per sample.The samples are bulked, mixed and then a subsample of about one pound of soil (a pint) is submitted to the lab. Nutrients in the soil are naturally stratified with higher nutrient levels on the surface. This is due to plant residue breakdown and fertilizer placement. Each core taken should be taken to the same depth in the soil profile. Generally a 6- or 8-inch sample should be taken.The primary goal is to measure the ability of the soil to provide the soluble nutrient needed for crop production for two of our three macro nutrients (phosphorus and potassium) plus measure soil acidity which governs availability of micro nutrients. A secondary goal is to compare soil test results over time. No soil test result should be considered in isolation, look at past results before making major modifications.last_img read more

Win a Magic: The Gathering trackable and discover the golden city of Orazca!

first_img SharePrint RelatedWin a Magic: The Gathering Trackable and explore IXALAN!August 22, 2017In “News”Gewinne ein Magic: The Gathering Trackable und entdecke die goldene Stadt Orazca!November 28, 2017In “Deutsch”Inside Geocaching HQ Podcast Transcript (Episode 11): The Magic of trackable promotionsMay 10, 2018Similar post Stake your claim on the golden city of Orazca! To kick off the excitement of their January launch of Rivals of Ixalan, Magic: The Gathering teamed up with Geocaching to release thousands of trackables to geocachers and fans around the globe!Be a part of the action as you seek out dinosaurs, pirates, merfolk, and vampires in a quest to be the first to discover the golden city. Take a Magic: The Gathering trackable with you from cache to cache to reveal card previews. Plus, we’re tracking mileage which will play a role in determining who controls the golden city at the end of the Rivals of Ixalan story.Share your latest find on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter using the hashtags #MTGGeocachers and MTGRIXEnter to win a free trackable: Geocaching.com/Magic.Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Forrester: Middle-Aged Developers Driving Cloud Computing

first_imgHow Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud Tags:#Amazon#Azure#cloud#cloud developers#developers#enterprise IT#Open Source Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo… Matt Asay Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting In other words, as with open source, these developers can’t be bothered with corporate bureaucracy. In an earlier Forrester survey, developers said the primary benefit of the cloud is that it’s the “Fastest way for me to get my project done and deployed.” This calls to mind Redmonk analyst Stephen O’Grady’s assertion that “Convenience trumps just about everything” when it comes to cloud adoption.A Race To Capture Middle-Aged Hearts And MindsAmazon was the first to spot this market, and is now the preferred  Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) offering for 71% of developers, according to Forrester, with Microsoft Azure (25%) and Google (23%) playing catch-up. Cloud developers overwhelmingly want IaaS because they want “deep platform access” to things like app servers, web servers, and databases, as Staten noted in his OSBC presentation.Again, cloud developers are not neophytes. They’re serious developers who understand core IT infrastructure but want the freedom to get work done without waiting on corporate procurement or legal policies to catch up.As such, the IaaS platform that best serves this need will win.Image courtesy of Jørund F Pedersen, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Enterprise IT keeps trying to shove the public cloud genie back into a private cloud bottle, but the majority of developers are having none of that, according to Forrester principal analyst James Staten (@staten7), speaking at the Open Business Conference (OSBC) on Tuesday in San Francisco. Interestingly, these cloud-savvy developers aren’t newbie troublemakers just getting started in enterprise IT, but instead skew older and more experienced. Perhaps with Twisted Sister cranking on their Walkmans, this rising breed of middle-aged cloud developer isn’t “gonna take it anymore.”Which, of course, is exactly how open source made its way in the enterprise.Open Source: Not So Young But Very RestlessBack in 2002, Boston Consulting Group surveyed (PDF) the open-source developer community to get a feel for the demographics of the movement. While early open-source development was thought to be marshalled by anarchists and free code-loving hippies, BCG’s study revealed that the open-source community was actually comprised of experience IT professionals with an average of 11 years of programming experience.And while the open source ranks weren’t filled with Baby Boomers, they also weren’t being pushed by Generation Y. The average age was 30 years old. While not exactly middle aged, it skewed much older than expected.This shouldn’t have been surprising. Often, those who have the most value to contribute are more experienced programmers. In addition, such programmers have also been working in enterprise IT long enough to recognize a better, more efficient way of developing software, and to have the job security needed to take a risk on coloring outside the lines of enterprise IT policies.Cloud As An Antidote To Corporate BureaucracyIt’s therefore not surprising to see cloud computing also driven by experienced developers, rather than newly minted graduates. According to Forrester’s Forrsights Developer Survey, Q1 2013, 71% of cloud developers have at least six years of programming experience, and some 11% have been writing code for over 20 years. These aren’t novices trying the cloud because it’s “cool.”Indeed, delving deeper into Forrester’s data, the primary reason developers turn to the cloud is speed of development:last_img read more

Touch Football Australia Joins Sports Super

first_imgTo our passionate and committed players, administrators and officials, you are now eligible to join Sports Super – the super fund that is as committed to Touch Football as you, and we invite you to find out more to see if this could be an appropriate superannuation program for you. Sports Super has low fees for all members, is secure and strong – part of Australia’s largest super fund, has a strong and consistent performance history, and is quick and easy to join. Unlike all other fund programs Sports Super pays part of your fees directly back into our great sport. This is a fantastic new revenue opportunity for the sport of Touch Football which will allow us to continue to provide first class training and development programs.  Score now with a great, secure, low fee fund with proven returns that uniquely benefits the whole Touch Football community. You may also be able to make some significant super fee savings. To find out more about this opportunity, email sportssuper@myclubfinancialservices.com.au. A superannuation fee comparison between Sports Super and your existing arrangement can be provided upon request.last_img read more

Salaried workers beware GM cuts are a warning for all

first_imgDETROIT — For generations, the career path for smart kids around Detroit was to get an engineering or business degree and get hired by an automaker or parts supplier. If you worked hard and didn’t screw up, you had a job for life with enough money to raise a family, take vacations and buy a weekend cottage in northern Michigan.Now that once-reliable route to prosperity appears to be vanishing, as evidenced by General Motors’ announcement this week that it plans to shed 8,000 white-collar jobs on top of 6,000 blue-collar ones.It was a humbling warning that in this era of rapid and disruptive technological change, those with a college education are not necessarily insulated from the kind of layoffs factory workers know all too well.The cutbacks reflect a transformation underway in both the auto industry and the broader U.S. economy, with nearly every type of business becoming oriented toward computers, software and automation.“This is a big mega-trend pervading the whole economy,” said Mark Muro, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution who has researched changes being caused by the digital age.Cities that suffered manufacturing job losses decades ago are now grappling with the problem of fewer opportunities for white-collar employees such as managers, lawyers, bankers and accountants. Since 2008, The Associated Press found, roughly a third of major U.S. metro areas have lost a greater percentage of white-collar jobs than blue-collar jobs. It’s a phenomenon seen in such places as Wichita, Kansas, with its downsized aircraft industry, and towns in Wisconsin that have lost auto, industrial machinery or furniture-making jobs.In GM’s case, the jobs that will be shed through buyouts and layoffs are held largely by people who are experts in the internal combustion engine — mechanical engineers and others who spent their careers working on fuel injectors, transmissions, exhaust systems and other components that won’t be needed for the electric cars that eventually will drive themselves. GM, the nation’s largest automaker, says those vehicles are its future.“We’re talking about high-skilled people who have made a substantial investment in their education,” said Marina Whitman, a retired professor of business and public policy at the University of Michigan and a former GM chief economist. “The transitions can be extremely painful for a subset of people.”GM is still hiring white-collar employees, but the new jobs are for those who can write software code, design laser sensors or develop batteries and other devices for future vehicles.Those who are being thrown out of work might have learn new skills if they hope to find new jobs, underscoring what Whitman said is another truism about the new economy: “You’ve got to regard education as a lifetime process. You probably are going to have multiple jobs in your lifetime. You’ve got to stay flexible.”Whitman said mechanical engineers are smart people who could transfer their skills to software or batteries, but they’ll need training, and that takes time and money.“In the past with these kinds of changes, eventually new jobs have been created,” she said. “Will it happen this time, or is the change taking place too fast for everybody to be absorbed? I don’t know.”Although the job cuts took him and co-workers by surprise, Tracy Lucas, 54, a GM engine quality manager, decided to take the buyout and change careers. His children are grown and on their own, and with 33 years in at GM, he will get a pension and health care.The buyout will also give him about eight months of pay, enough time to take his newly earned master’s degree in business administration and look for different work. He said he will be glad to leave some tedious management tasks behind but will miss seeing through a lot of work to reduce engine warranty claims.He is leaving in part, he said, to save a job for younger co-workers. GM got 2,250 white-collar workers to take buyouts, and will have to complete the cutbacks by way of layoffs.“I really hate that we have to go into the whole process of tapping people on the shoulder,” Lucas said. “I don’t think the second wave is going to be pretty at all. It’s going to be brutal.”The white-collar cutbacks — combined with more to come at Ford, which is likewise making the transition from personal ownership of gasoline-burning vehicles to ride-sharing and self-driving electric cars — could hamper the renaissance underway in Detroit, which is emerging from bankruptcy and a long population decline.Many of these automotive industry engineers and managers are pulling down six-figure salaries, and some may have to move out of the Detroit metro area for new jobs.The Brookings Institution’s Muro wonders whether auto companies will bring more electrical engineers and software developers to Michigan or put them in places where such jobs are already clustered, such as San Francisco, Seattle, Boston or near major research universities.“This is how regions change and labour markets change,” Muro said.GM says it will hire in the Detroit area, but its autonomous-vehicle workforce has grown to over 1,000 at offices in San Francisco and Seattle.Nearly all of the 8,000 white-collar cutbacks will be in metropolitan Detroit, largely at GM’s technical centre in Warren, a suburb north of the city. That’s equal to about 4 per cent of the managerial and engineering jobs in the Detroit-Warren area, according to the Labor Department. Managerial salaries in the area average $124,000.Ford, which is just beginning its salaried workforce downsizing, hasn’t said how many will go. But even if it’s half of GM’s total, the white-collar losses around Detroit will approach those during the financial crisis of a decade ago, when the metro areas shed 14,450 managerial and engineering jobs. That was 8.9 per cent of those types of jobs in the metro areas.Layoffs are also likely to spread to auto parts suppliers, which won’t need to design and build as many parts for gas-powered cars.While GM says cutting these positions is necessary to save money to invest in such technology and in self-driving cars, there are possible long-term costs to shedding so many experienced workers in one swoop, especially if the switch to electric vehicles stalls, said Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, a management professor at Brandeis University. If that were to happen, the cutbacks could leave GM without the vital expertise it needs.Even the most skilled white-collar workers need to spend less and be prepared to change jobs or locations to stay employed, said Rick Knoth, a retired GM industrial engineer who survived a 2008 downsizing by taking an early retirement package after 37 years with the company.Knoth said he is confident most engineers are smart enough to turn their skills into a new career. But all white-collar employees need to be ready for change because it comes fast, he said.“The world isn’t like it used to be, that’s for sure,” he said. “You can’t count on anything.”____Corey Williams contributed to this report from Warren, Michigan. Boak reported from Washington. Follow Tom Krisher on Twitter at https://twitter.com/tkrisher .Tom Krisher And Josh Boak, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Maha IAS official shoots at injures wife hangs self

first_imgMumbai: A 57-year-old IAS official allegedly committed suicide by hanging after firing two rounds from an airgun at his wife in the early hours of Friday in Maharashtra’s Solapur district, police said.Vijaykumar Bhagwat Pawar hanged himself after shooting at and injuring his wife Sonali in Marvade in Mangalwedha town in Solapur, over 380 kilometres from here, an official said. The Indian Administrative Service official was posted in the state’s Skill Development department and had previously served as collector of Nandurbar district. “Neighbours heard shouting and gun shots from the Pawar household following which they alerted police. The couple was rushed to hospital where doctors declared Pawar dead on arrival. Sonali Pawar has sustained bullet injuries and is undergoing treatment,” the official said. “We have recovered two empty rounds and one live airgun cartridge. A probe has been instituted to find out what caused the incident,” he added.last_img read more

EC orders 26 lakh bottles of indelible ink… worth Rs 33 cr

first_imgNew Delhi: Ahead of the Lok Sabha polls, the Election Commission (EC) has ordered 26 lakh indelible ink bottles worth Rs 33 crore. The seven-phase election will begin on April 11 and conclude on May 19. In the 2014 Lok Sabha elections, the poll panel had bought 21.5 lakh phials, 4.5 lakh less than this year.Mysore Paints and Varnish Ltd, a government of Karnataka undertaking, is the only authorised manufacturer of indelible ink for the Election Commission. Mysore Paints and Varnish Ltd Managing Director Chandrashekhar Doddamani said that the company has received an order for 26 lakh phials of 10cc each from the Election Commission. “The expected turnover is approximately Rs 33 crore,” he said. The order, Doddamani said, is higher than the last general elections by 4.5 lakh phials. In this election, nearly 90 crore people are eligible to case their votes for which the Election Commission will set up nearly 10 lakh polling stations across the country. In 1962, the Election Commission, in collaboration with the Law Ministry, National Physical Laboratory and National Research Development Corporation, had made an agreement with Mysore Paints and Varnish Ltd for supply of indelible ink for Lok Sabha and assembly elections. Since then, it has been supplying the ink for elections in India. A bottle of indelible ink contains 10 cubic centimetres (cc). As per modern measurement methods, one cubic centimetre is equivalent to one millilitre. Mysore Paints and Varnish Ltd exports indelible ink to more than 30 countries across the globe. Soon after the note ban, the company was asked to provide indelible ink to banks to mark customers exchanging defunct currency notes to check suspicious deposits. Grappling with unending queues and frayed tempers in banks and to check operation of syndicates after the note ban, the government had introduced the system of marking customers exchanging defunct currency notes with indelible ink.last_img read more

Russian award for Modi

first_imgNew Delhi: Prime Minister Narendra Modi was on Thursday named for the ‘Order of St Andrew the Apostle’ award by Russia for exceptional services in promoting bilateral ties between the two countries, a Russian embassy official said. The Order of St Andrew the Apostle is the highest state decoration of Russia, the official said. Modi has been conferred with the award for exceptional services in promoting special and privileged strategic partnership between Russia and India, the official said.last_img

Reggie Waynes Knee Injury Will End His Season

The Colts’ Reggie Wayne will miss the rest of the season after suffering an ACL injury during Sunday night’s win over the Denver Broncos.Wayne went down in the fourth quarter when he tried to come back and catch a low pass. He wasn’t hit on the play but couldn’t get up after planting his right foot into the turf.Wayne is a big time receiver, so this is bad for the Colts. Last week, he became the ninth member of the league’s 1,000-catch club. The pro-bowler had started 189 consecutive games, which is the longest streak among all active receivers in the league.Coach Chuck Pagano didn’t answer the media questions on whether they would sign another receiver to replace Wayne.