10 months agoSevilla ready bid for Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Sevilla ready bid for Chelsea striker Alvaro Morataby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSevilla are ready to bid for Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata.The Mirror says Sevilla sporting director Joaquin Caparros has sounded out Morata’s representatives and they are trying to persuade Chelsea to do a deal this month.The Spanish club are offering a loan deal worth £5m until the summer when they will pay £35m plus add-ons for the Spain international.Morata has become disillusioned at Chelsea after falling out of favour with Maurizio Sarri.But Chelsea are still reluctant to let Morata go without strengthening their own squad first. last_img

11 days agoMason slams Wales handling of James head injury

first_imgMason slams Wales handling of James head injuryby Paul Vegas11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveRyan Mason has slammed Wales’ handling of a head injury to Manchester United winger Daniel James in Sunday’s 1-1 draw with Croatia.James appeared to be unconscious after clashing with opponent Domagoj Vida, but was allowed to continue in the match.Former Spurs midfielder Mason suffered a career-ending concussion in 2018 and believes Wales were wrong to permit James to play on.”Daniel James was just knocked out unconscious! Yet three minutes later he has been allowed back onto the pitch,” Mason posted on his Twitter account.Both James and Wales coach Ryan Giggs denied the Manchester United winger was unconscious after the incident. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

ESPN Releases Game Times For 10 Opening Weekend Games

first_imgESPN College Football Playoff logo.ESPN ESPN AnnouncersESPNThe opening weekend for this year’s college football season, simply put, is going to be epic. Monday, ESPN/ABC released game times for 10 of the best matchups we’re going to see.South Carolina and Vanderbilt will kick things off on Thursday, September 1 at 8:00 PM ET, oddly enough in an SEC regular season tilt. Georgia Tech and Boston College will play in Dublin Ireland, at 7:30 AM ET on Saturday morning.Here are the rest of the games – including Oklahoma vs. Houston, LSU vs. Wisconsin, USC vs. Alabama, Clemson vs. Auburn, Notre Dame vs. Texas and Ole Miss vs. Florida State.9/1/2016: South Carolina at Vanderbilt on ESPN (8:00 PM ET) 9/3/2016: Georgia Tech vs. Boston College on ESPN2 (7:30 AM ET) 9/3/2016: Oklahoma vs. Houston on ABC (Noon ET) 9/3/2016: Hawaii at Michigan on ESPN (Noon ET) 9/3/2016: LSU vs. Wisconsin on ABC (3:30 PM ET) 9/3/2016: Georgia vs. North Carolina on ESPN (5:30 PM ET) 9/3/2016: USC vs. Alabama on ABC (8:00 PM ET) 9/3/2016: Clemson at Auburn on ESPN (9:00 PM ET) 9/4/2016: Notre Dame vs. Texas on ABC (7:30 PM ET) 9/5/2016: Ole Miss vs. Florida State on ESPN (8:00 PM ET)Which will you be watching?last_img read more

Key barriers that prevent access to antibiotics in low and middleincome countries

first_img Encourage research and development of new or improved antibiotics, diagnostic tests, vaccines, and alternatives to antibiotics for bacterial infections, Support the registration of antibiotics in more countries according to clinical need, Develop and implement national treatment guidelines for the use of antimicrobials, Explore innovative funding for essential antibiotics, Ensure the quality of antibiotics and strengthen pharmaceutical regulatory capacity, and Encourage local manufacturing for cost-effective antibiotics. Source: https://cddep.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 9 2019Antibiotic resistance is an emerging global public health threat spurred by the overuse and misuse of antibiotics. While “overuse” of antibiotics is widely accepted as a major health challenge, it is less well known that many people in low- and middle-income countries continue to die because they lack access to antibiotics. The majority of the world’s annual 5.7 million antibiotic-treatable deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries where the mortality burden from treatable bacterial infections far exceeds the estimated annual 700,000 deaths from antibiotic-resistant infections.In a new report, titled “Access Barriers to Antibiotics” (available upon request and online at http://www.cddep.org beginning April 11, 2019) researchers at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) conducted stakeholder interviews in Uganda, India, and Germany, and literature reviews to identify key access barriers to antibiotics in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. The report makes several recommendations proposing action on R&D (new antibiotics and rapid diagnostic tests), strengthening regulatory capacities, encouraging the development and diversification of quality local manufacturing, exploring innovative funding to reduce out-of-pocket payments, better treatment guidelines, and awareness raising.”Lack of access to antibiotics kills more people currently than does antibiotic resistance, but we have not had a good handle on why these barriers are created,” said Dr. Ramanan Laxminarayan, CDDEP director and a co-author of the report. The findings of the report show that even after the discovery of a new antibiotic, regulatory hurdles and substandard health facilities delay or altogether prevent widespread market entry and drug availability,” explains Dr. Laxminarayan. “Our research shows that of 21 new antibiotics entering markets between 1999 and 2014, less than five were registered in most countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Just the mere existence of an effective antibiotic does not mean that they are available in countries where they are most needed.”Health facilities in many low- and middle-income countries are substandard and lack staff who are properly trained in administering antibiotics. In Uganda, 10 to 54 percent of health staff posts are unfilled because of poor pay, high stress, lack of resources, and poor management. Staffing on wards is inadequate to administer medicines, patients miss antibiotic doses, and public nurses sometimes request compensation for administering medicines. In India, there is one government doctor for every 10,189 people (the World Health Organization [WHO] recommends a ratio of 1:1,000), or a deficit of 600,000 doctors, and the nurse:patient ratio is 1:483, implying a shortage of 2 million nurses.In low- and middle-income countries, weak drug supply chains fail to make antibiotics consistently available. In Uganda, researchers found that many products were stored and transported long distances without cold-chain temperature control, and only 47 percent of medicines on the WHO’s Essential Medicines List were procured through the centralized authority, resulting in chronic shortages. Moreover, public-private supply chain delivery systems were not leveraged to improve drug availability outside specific programs.Related StoriesTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTApplication of machine learning methods to healthcare outcomes researchAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyLack of oversight and regulation in the drug manufacturing and supply chain leads to poor drug quality and falsified medicines; 17 percent of the substandard or falsified medicines reported to the WHO are antibiotics, and each year, more than 169,000 childhood pneumonia deaths are caused by falsified antibiotics, researchers reported.Even when antibiotics are available, patients are often unable to afford them. High out-of-pocket medical costs to the patient are compounded by limited government spending for health services. In Uganda, where just 8.9 percent of the national budget goes to health services, 41 percent of health expenditure is out-of-pocket, and 23 percent of households spend more than 10 percent of their income on healthcare. Moreover, limited government spending results in drug shortages in public health facilities which forces patients to go to private pharmacies or drugstores to buy medicines that should be provided free. In India, 65 percent of health expenditure is out-of-pocket, versus 13 percent in Germany, and such expenditures push some 57 million people into poverty each year in India alone.Worldwide, the irrational use of antibiotics and poor antimicrobial stewardship lead to treatment failure and propagate the spread of drug resistance which, in turn, further narrows the available array of effective antibiotics. Finally, research and development for new antimicrobials, vaccines, and diagnostic tests has slowed since the 1960s as profitable investment in this area is limited by low sales volumes, short duration of treatment, competition with established products and cheaper generics, and the possibility that resistance will rapidly emerge.National governments, policymakers, pharmaceutical companies, public and private healthcare institutions, and international public health bodies all have a role to play in improving access to antibiotics worldwide. While interventions to improve access must take into account differences among countries, the researchers provided the following recommendations to address key barriers and improve access to antibiotics:last_img read more

The sense of touch is defined and fully functional before birth

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)May 3 2019All the surface of the human body is represented in the cerebral cortex in a transversal band localized at the external part of the cerebral hemispheres: the somatosensory cortex. Each body region occupies in that band a distinct extension depending on its use and sensitivity. For instance, the hands and the lips, on which humans rely most, occupy the largest area. Thus, the 3D representation of that map forms the known sensory homunculus.Similar to a cartographic map, each represented region of the body in the somatosensory cortex is connected to its corresponding body surface thanks to the neuronal pathways that keep a strict topographical relationship along the nervous system. In this pathway, the thalamus, a deep structure of the brain that lies beneath the cortices, plays a key role by relaying the peripheral information to the cortex without losing the point-to-point correspondence. Using this extraordinary precision, we can discriminate which point of our body is receiving an external stimulus and have a well-defined map of the periphery. Such accurate topography constitutes the basis of the sense of touch and is essential for survival of the species.How are the neurons of the somatosensory cortex organized during development to perform these functions? Neurons of this brain region, as in the rest of the cerebral cortex, are assembled into columns that are placed next to each other like building bricks. It remains unknown, however, how these columnar structures become functional correspondents of the distant regions of the periphery. Although some studies highlight the role of genetic factors to form initial columns, most studies in the past decade have emphasized that this disposition is achieved as a result of sensory experience during postnatal life.Now a study by the UMH-CSIC Institute of Neuroscience in Alicante published in Science shows that cortical columns are already defined and fully functional before birth thanks to the spontaneous electrical activity of the embryonic thalamus. Far from being a mere relay station, the thalamus guides the formation of the functional cortical columns and the concomitant somatotopic map in the still immature cortex, before external sensory experience is an effective source of information. In particular, the thalamus does so by generating and transmitting patterns of spontaneous activity (called waves) to the developing cortex. The discovery was made in rodents, in a particular and extensive region of their somatosensory cortex: the barrel cortex. This area contains the representation of the whiskers of the snout that are, for rodents, sensorially equivalent to our hands.Related StoriesNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementia”Our data reveal that the embryonic patterns of electrical activity of the thalamus, the brain structure through which sensory information passes to the cortex, organize the architecture of the cortical somatosensory map. The development of this map involves the emergence of functional cortical columns in embryos, driven by activity in the form of waves that spontaneously propagate through the thalamus”, “We propose that this pattern of activity that takes place during the embryonic stages prepares the cortical areas and circuits for receiving information from the senses after birth”, explains CSIC researcher Guillermina López-Bendito.The researchers point out that since thalamic waves are not unique to the structure of the thalamus involved in the sense of touch but spread to other senses, such as vision or hearing, the cortical mapping principles described in this paper are likely shared by other sensory modalities.”It is very probable that this mechanism involved in the formation of the sensory maps that we have discovered in rodents can be extrapolated to humans, because the organization of the cortex is evolutionarily conserved between species”, explains López-Bendito.”The spontaneous activity of the thalamus is not something circumstantial, but contains important information for the construction of the brain during embryonic development. It was previously thought that neuronal circuits were built on a genetic imprint and that the postnatal sensory experience ends up defining the maps. This work questions this vision because it demonstrates the existence of these maps before birth,”; says Lopez-Bendito. “Our results indicate that the spontaneous thalamic activity during the embryonic phase is essential for the normal development of the brain, defining what in neurobiology is called a critical period, i.e. a period of time in which plastic changes are possible but after which alterations would be irreparable”; she adds.In addition to highlighting a novel mechanism for regulating brain development, such as the pattern of intrinsic embryonic activity in a subcortical structure, this work may have long-term repercussions in the understanding of certain pathologies. For example, in some disorders of neural development, such as autism or fragile X syndrome, in which alterations in the cortical structure are associated with sensory processing alterations.Source: http://www.csic.es/last_img read more

Largest Neolithic Settlement in Israel Uncovered Up to 3000 People May Have

first_img Photos: 2,000-Year-Old Roman Road and Coins Discovered in Israel Back to the Stone Age: 17 Key Milestones in Paleolithic Life Photos: Roadside Dig Reveals 10,000-Year-Old House in Israel Archaeologists have known about this location, called the Motza site, for decades. However, now that the government plans to build a new highway entrance and new roundabouts there, the Israel Antiquities Authority sent a team to do a full-scale excavation of the Neolithic settlement, Vardi told Live Science. This effort quickly became the largest excavation of a Neolithic site in the country, he said. During the Neolithic, hunter-gatherer groups began farming and making permanent settlements. So, it came as no surprise when they found large buildings with rooms where Neolithic people once lived, public facilities and places for rituals. Alleyways ran between the buildings, showing that the settlement had an advanced layout. Some buildings even had plaster floors. The team also uncovered human burials beneath and around the houses. Some of the burials also held burial goods, likely offerings that may have been given to help the deceased in the afterlife. Some of these grave goods came from far away — including obsidian beads from Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) and seashells from the Mediterranean Sea and Red Sea — indicating that the people at this site traded with neighboring regions. The excavation also uncovered several stone and mother-of-pearl bracelets, which, given their small size, were likely worn by children or adolescents, Vardi said. He added that one burial showed that these bracelets were worn on the upper arm. The site also has thousands of stone arrowheads for hunting, axes for felling trees, and sickle blades and knives, as well as figurines whose styles date to the Neolithic. Radiocarbon dating of the seeds found at the site indicates that people lived there between 9,000 and 8,800 years ago, Vardi said. In addition to farming crops and keeping goats, these people kept cows and pigs; they also hunted game, such as gazelle, deer, wolves and foxes, as shown by animal remains found there. “Based on the data that we have and from the fauna, we have a pretty good notion that the people at the site were farmers and they were specialists in what they did,” Vardi said. After the Neolithic period ended, people continued to live there. It’s clear why this spot was so desirable, Vardi said, as it’s near a large spring and several smaller springs that supply fresh water. The site is now 3.1 miles (5 kilometers) from Jerusalem, on the banks of the Sorek Stream. The entire Motza site is about 0.1 square miles (30 to 40 hectares). As the excavation wraps up, the team still has a lot on its plate. The researchers plan to publish several papers and articles for the public on the site, as well as put some of the artifacts in museums for public viewing, Vardi said.center_img Before it gets destroyed by a newly constructed highway, a 9,000-year-old Neolithic site just outside of Jerusalem is getting an exhaustive excavation, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority. The humans who lived there during the Neolithic (the last period of the Stone Age) were a sophisticated bunch. Many of them were likely farmers who had stored hundreds of thousands of seeds — including lentils, chickpeas and beans — in storage facilities. These ancient people also kept domesticated goats, as shown by animal remains found at the site, and they traded with neighboring regions, such as what is now Turkey, Jordan and the areas around the Red Sea. “This is the first time that such a large-scale settlement from the Neolithic period — 9,000 years ago — [has been] discovered in Israel,” Hamoudi Khalaily and Jacob Vardi, archaeologists and excavation directors at the site, who work with the Israel Antiquities Authority, said in a statement. “At least 2,000 [to] 3,000 residents lived here — an order of magnitude that parallels a present-day city.” [See Photos of the Neolithic Excavation]Advertisement Largest Neolithic Excavation on Record in IsraelArchaeologists are excavating a 9,000-year-old farming settlement in Israel that dates to the Neolithic. Credit: Yaniv Berman/Israel Antiquities AuthorityVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65956-largest-neolithic-settlement-in-israel.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:4502:45Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?02:31Surgical Robotics00:29Video – Giggly Robot关闭  Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMarie Claire | HanacureMeet The Beauty Equivalent To TIME’s Person Of The Year AwardMarie Claire | HanacureUndoVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoDr. Marty Nature's Feast Freeze-Dried RAW Cat Food3 Signs Something’s Wrong Inside Your Cat’s BodyDr. Marty Nature’s Feast Freeze-Dried RAW Cat FoodUndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndoClassmatesSearch For Any High School Yearbook, It’s Free.ClassmatesUndoGundry MD SupplementsTop Cardiologist: This One Thing Will Properly Flush Out Your BowelsGundry MD SupplementsUndolast_img read more

A Common Cold Virus Wiped Away Bladder Cancer in One Patient

first_img 7 Odd Things That Raise Your Risk of Cancer (and 1 That Doesn’t) A simple cold virus could wipe out tumors in a form of bladder cancer, a small new study suggests. Though the idea of using viruses to fight cancer isn’t new, this is the first time a cold virus effectively treated an early-stage form of bladder cancer. In one patient, it eliminated a cancerous tumor, the group reported July 4 in the journal Clinical Cancer Research. A group of researchers conducted an early-stage clinical trial in which they infected 15 bladder cancer patients with coxsackievirus A21, which is one of the viruses that cause the common cold. Coxsackievirus is not a genetically modified virus; it’s “something that occurs in nature,” said senior author Hardev Pandha, a professor of medical oncology at the University of Surrey in England. [Exercise May Reduce the Risk of These 13 Cancers] The researchers gave the patients the virus through catheters that the patients already had inserted for other treatments. They left the virus-filled catheter in for an hour to pump the fluids into the bladder and repeated this treatment. Then, the patients underwent surgery to remove what was left of their bladder tumors. In one patient, the virus completely destroyed the tumor. In all of the other patients, the researchers found evidence that the virus had damaged the tumors and had spurred the immune system to send an army of immune cells to the tumors. None of the patients had any significant side effects, Pandha said. Researchers thought this method would work because the outer membranes of cancerous bladder cells contain a gateway for the coxsackievirus: a molecule called ICAM-1. Because healthy cells don’t carry this molecule, the coxsackievirus doesn’t attack them. Once the virus gets into the cell, it hijacks the cell’s machinery and ends up killing it. Even more cancer cells die when the immune cells are recruited. ICAM-1 is also expressed by other cancer cells, and coxsackievirus has, in fact been previously shown to be effective in treating very advanced bladder cancer and other cancers, such as melanoma, Pandha said. Even so, this is still an early-stage trial, and there’s still a long way to go before the method can be used in treatment, Pandha said. “This would be the foundation for much larger studies where we’d build on this,” he said. Newer studies will try to make the treatment more effective and stop the cancer from coming back, he added. Unfortunately, just getting a common cold won’t treat the cancer on its own. Pandha’s team gave a much higher dose of the virus than you would get if someone coughed on you and you got sick, for example. Interestingly, the patients who were given the virus through the catheter did not get cold symptoms. “I agree that [such viruses are] good therapeutic target[s]” for certain types of cancers, like bladder cancer, said Grant McFadden, director of the Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy at Arizona State University, who was not a part of the study. But he noted that many studies have looked at whether viruses can target cancer cells. In fact, a host of viruses have been studied for attacking bladder cancer, specifically. It’s likely that many viruses will work well to treat bladder cancer and at least some tumor-destroying viruses “will get approved for use in humans,” McFadden told Live Science. “But this paper isn’t really new or innovative.” In fact, the idea of using viruses to treat cancer goes back nearly 100 years, Pandha said, but only in the past decade or so has it gained momentum. Editor’s note: This article was updated. Only a couple of the authors (not Pandha) are employed by Viralytics, a Merck-owned biotech company that is developing viral-based cancer treatments. 7 Side Effects of Cancer Treatment, and How to Cope with Them Colorful But Deadly: Images of Brain Cancer Originally published on Live Science.last_img read more

Sheshnag in trouble as Brahmaputra water hisses over danger mark in Guwahati

first_img Next India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 21:37 IST Water has reached near the feet of the statue of Lord Vishnu. (Photo: ANI)A statue of Vishnu sitting on Sheshnag seems to be in danger. The statue is placed on a vertical pillar in the Brahmaputra river. The statue seemed to be on the verge of drowning as the water level crossed the danger mark following rainfall in the region. In a picture, the water is seen to have reached the feet of the statue on the pillar in the river near Chakreshwar temple in Kalipur.The impact of an increase in the water level of the Brahmaputra river was also seen in Morigaon district in Assam. In Tengaguri area of Morigaon, a building of a primary school collapsed due to the rising water level in the Brahmaputra river. The incident was captured on camera.The flood situation in Assam continued to worsen as new areas flooded on Saturday. The Assam State Disaster Management Authority (ASDMA) has said that 25 districts of the state are under water. One person died in a flood-related incident in Dhemaji in the last 24 hours taking the death toll to seven due to floods and landslides.According to the ASDMA, a total of 1,405,711 people have been affected by the deluge in 25 districts. “Over 20,000 people are living in 234 relief camps opened by the district administration,” an official of the ASDMA said on Saturday while adding that 51,722 hectares of agricultural land have also been submerged so far affecting the farmers.The affected districts include Dhemaji, Lakhimpur, Barpeta, Morigaon, Biswanath, Sonitpur, Darrang, Goalpara, Nagaon, Golaghat, Jorhat, Sivasagar, Dibrugarh and Tinsukia, the ASDMA said.The flood situation in Dhemaji and Lakhimpur remained the worst where most of the people have been affected. Several houses, roads and bridges have also been damaged after the breach of embankments that have led to flooding in many areas.The water level in Kaziranga National Park, spread over the floodplains of the Brahmaputra river, also increased following incessant rains. Sailen Pande, PRO of Assam Forest and Environment Minister, said, “This year, Ministry of Forest and Environment, Assam had taken precautions to deal with the flood.””Over 70 per cent of the park has been submerged with flood waters. All staffs have been put on alert to deal with the flood,” Sailen Pande said.Barpeta is the worst hit with 5.22 lakh people affected, followed by 1.38 lakh in Dhemaji and 95,000 in Morigaon, ASDMA said.Also Read | Bihar fears floods as heavy rains swell riversAlso Read | 2 dead, 390 houses submerged in Mizoram floodAlso Watch | In Depth: Decoding the link between floods and droughtsFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byChanchal Chauhan Assam floods: Sheshnag in trouble as Brahmaputra water hisses over danger mark in GuwahatiThe statue seemed to be on the verge of drowning as the water level crossed the danger mark following rainfall in the region.advertisementlast_img read more

Assam flood situation worsens Army called in

first_img Press Trust of India GuwahatiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 23:59 IST Over eight lakh people have been affected by the flood situation in Assam. (Photo: ANI)The Army was called for assistance in Assam as the flood situation in the state worsened on Friday with the toll rising to six and affecting nearly 8.7 lakh people across 21 districts.Officials said the Army’s assistance was sought in Baksa district to aid the personnel of National Disaster Response Force and State Disaster Response Force in rescuing marooned people.Assam State Disaster Management Authority (ASDMA) officials said three more persons died in rain and flood-related incidents in Golaghat and Dima Hasao districts Friday. While two persons died in the flood at Bokakhat revenue circle in Golaghat, one died in landslide in Haflong in Dima Hasao district.It said about 8.7 lakh persons have been hit by the deluge in Dhemaji, Lakhimpur, Biswanath, Sonitpur, Darrang, Baksa, Barpeta, Nalbari, Chirang, Bongaigaon, Kokrajhar, Goalpara, Morigaon, Hojai, Nagaon, Golaghat, Majuli, Jorhat, Sivasagar, Dibrugarh and Tinsukia districts.The state has a total of 33 districts and till yesterday three persons had died in floods and around 4.23 lakh people were affected in 17 districts.Barpeta is the worst hit with 3.5 lakh people affected, followed by Dhemaji where 1.2 lakh people are hit. They are followed by Bongaigaon where the number of affected is 62,500, ASDMA said.Massive erosions have taken place at various places in Chirang, Barpeta and Baksa due to the floods, which has submerged a total 1,556 villages and damaged 27,864.16 hectares of crop area, embankments, roads, bridges, culverts and other infrastructure in the affected districts.The authorities are running 68 relief camps and distribution centres in 11 districts, where 7,643 people are taking shelter currently, ASDMA said.The Army, NDRF and SDRF have rescued 1,160 persons in the state since Thursday and have distributed 1,281.35 quintals of rice, dal, salt and 1,493.46 litres of mustard oil, besides tarpaulin, water pouch, sanitary napkins, baby food and other essential items.Currently, Brahmaputra is flowing above its danger-mark at Guwahati, at Nimatighat in Jorhat, Tezpur in Sonitpur and at Goalpara and Dhubri towns, it said.Burhidehing river is flowing above its danger mark at Khowang in Dibrugarh, Desang river at Nanglamuraghat in Sivasagar, Dhansiri river at Numaligarh in Golaghat and Jia Bharali at NT Road Crossing in Sonitpur district. Kopili river is above the red at Kampur in Nagaon, Puthimari river at NH Road Crossing in Kamrup, Beki river at Road Bridge in Barpeta, Katakhal river at Matizuri in Hailakandi and Kushiyara river at Karimganj town, the ASDMA added.With the Brahmaputra flowing 2.27 meters above the danger level at Neematighat, ferry services to and from Majuli island, which is Asia’s largest river island, remained suspended for the fifth day Friday, Central Water Commission officials said here.The Inland Water Transport Authority of the state government has kept two of its vessels ready loaded with anti-erosion materials to meet any situation in the erosion-prone areas of the island.The swirling flood waters have forced the railway authority to control train services due to “settlement of tracks” in Lumding-Badarpur hill section, Northeast Frontier Railway Chief Public Relations Officer Pranav Jyoti Sharma said.Heavy rains have affected the train tracks between Jatinga Lumpur to New Harangajao station in Lumding-Badarpur hill section of the NF Railway, he added.As a result, some trains have either been cancelled or short terminated, Sharma said.Kaziranga National Park, the famed habitat of the Great Indian Rhino and a World Heritage site, has been affected too forcing the authorities to set up road barricades on the National Highway passing through it to limit the speed of vehicles, said Kaziranga Divisional Forest Officer Ruhini Saikia.The Golaghat administration has also imposed prohibitory orders under Section 144 CrPC in the areas near the park as the animals are coming out of it to go to the Karbi Anglong hills in search of safety in its high grounds.Also Read | Floods affect 8 lakh in Assam, 10 dead across Northeast as rains lash region | 10 pointsAlso Watch | In Depth: Decoding the link between floods and droughtsFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byChanchal Chauhan Assam flood situation worsens, Army called inOfficials said the Army’s assistance was sought in Baksa district to aid the personnel of National Disaster Response Force and State Disaster Response Force in rescuing marooned people.advertisement Nextlast_img read more