Richards-Porter Happy Earning From Chess

first_imgWhile some Jamaicans may not earn a comfortable living from their professional sporting pursuits, Woman International Chess Master Deborah Richards-Porter says that chess has taken her places and has given her a business from which she can live comfortably. Richards-Porter is the first Woman International Chess Master in the English-speaking Caribbean. Besides playing the sport she loves, she operates her own business, teaching chess to over 100 students. It is set up at different schools, while during summer and Christmas holidays, she has specific programmes tailored for her clients. “I have a chess business; I have chess as a profession, and seasonal programme for students who are interested in learning every day,” Richards Porter told The Gleaner. “You can make a decent living from chess, because I graduated from the University of the West Indies (UWI). I was doing research, and I stopped it to come and teach chess,” she outlined. Like most things, however, the flag-bearer says it depends on who you are and how you go about marketing and doing it. “It (chess) takes up a lot of my time, most of my life is chess right now, and working is more fun than work for me,” she reasoned. NOT ENOUGH RECOGNITION According to the veteran, Jamaicans need recognise chess as a sport. “No, I would not say I have gotten adequate recognition as a player. I think most people don’t know what is happening in and round chess. More has to be done from our side in terms of pushing sports that are not track and field and football so that we can get our recognition,” she underlined. The player began her career at 16 and described it as kind of a coincidence” how she started, as she was a former table tennis player. “Seven months after playing, I became national champion, and about a month after that, I was on my first plane ride going to Slovenia to play the chess Olympiad at the time,” she continued. Richards Porter added, “I found out within the first year that chess could take me places.” She has represented Jamaica at five Chess Olympiads, dating 2006, 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2016. She was named the RJR Sports Foundation Woman Chess Player of the Year. – S.F.last_img read more

Will Spector be set free?

first_imgThe judge asked if there was any way he could help, including re-reading specific instructions or clarifying instructions, or even having attorneys re-argue part or all of the case. “At this time I don’t believe that anything else will change the positions of the jurors,” the foreman responded. Polled individually, some jurors agreed with the foreman and others disagreed. One suggested further instruction about reasonable doubt. The record producer is charged with second-degree murder, and the judge previously ruled that the panel would decide only that charge and not consider lesser charges. The judge, however, told the attorneys that he was reconsidering and believed he might have cause to instruct the jury to consider involuntary manslaughter. The judge, amid discussions with lawyers, told jurors he wanted them to take a break and sent them home with instructions to return today. By Linda Deutsch THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The foreman of the jury in Phil Spector’s murder trial said Tuesday that the panel is at an impasse, and the judge told lawyers he was considering allowing the panel to consider a lesser charge. The juror told Superior Court Judge Larry Paul Fidler the panel was split 7-5, but he did not indicate which way it was leaning. “Just set the case aside for the rest of the day,” the judge told them. The defense immediately asked for a mistrial, but the judge denied it on grounds that three jurors indicated further instructions may help. If the deadlock persists and a mistrial is declared, prosecutors would have three options: seek a new trial of Spector, pursue a plea bargain or drop the charges. Spector, 67, is charged in the Feb. 3, 2003, shooting of actress Lana Clarkson, 40. The case went to the jury Sept. 10. Spector and his lawyers looked grim as they left court; Clarkson’s family members appeared sad. Clarkson was killed by a bullet fired from a gun in her mouth. The defense contended in the lengthy trial that she had many personal problems and killed herself either by accident or suicide. Spector was a producer of hit rock music records decades ago, creating what became known as the “Wall of Sound” technique. Clarkson had modest success as the star of Roger Corman’s 1985 film “Barbarian Queen.” She was working as a hostess at the House of Blues when she met Spector and went home with him, hours before she died. The judge ruled in August that the jury would consider only second-degree murder, saying the facts of the case did not support lesser offenses. Involuntary manslaughter involves causing a death through careless acts. The judge told jurors that to be guilty of second-degree murder, Spector “must have committed an act that caused the death of Lana Clarkson.” The act specified is pointing a gun at her and, while it was in Spector’s hand, causing it to enter her mouth. If involuntary manslaughter is presented as an option, the new instruction would say that Spector need only have caused her death by reckless behavior. “If the judge gives this instruction it sends a pretty clear message: If you don’t like murder or nothing, let me give you a compromise,” said Laurie Levenson, a former federal prosecutor.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more