Public Notice Reminder – Persons residing in the TCI on an Expired

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, August 25, 2017 – Providenciales – The Ministry of Border Control and Employment Services is hereby reminding all persons that are currently in the Turks and Caicos Islands on an expired Visa that they are residing here unlawfully.   Such persons are encouraged to leave the country voluntarily as any such person found to be in the country illegally will be prosecuted under the law.The Ministry encourages all persons to avail themselves of the Turks and Caicos Islands Immigration Ordinance 2015 and Immigration Regulations 2016 or to call the Customer Service Quality Assurance Manager, Emilio Seymour on (649) 338-4114 or email himat infobordercontrol@gov.tc should you require any further information or have any questions or concerns.The Ministry of Border Control and Employment Services thanks the public for their cooperation in this regard.Press Release: TCIG Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

People on the Move

first_img Jennifer Salant has been named vice president, business development, at Condé Nast Entertainment. She had been senior vice president, content creator, business development and operations, at Mode Media. The Board of Directors of Boston Common Press, the parent company of America’s Test Kitchen, has announced that Jack Bishop has been promoted to chief creative officer. Bishop, a frequent on-air personality for the America’s Test Kitchen television programs, is a founding member of the Cook’s Illustrated team and has served as editorial director for the company’s magazine, book, and digital businesses for the past decade. Bishop joined the staff of Cook’s Magazine in 1988 and helped launch Cook’s Illustrated in 1993. Last September, he was named executive web editor, a title that reflected his increased responsibilities of running their site and shaping digital presentation. In this new position, Kearney will take an expanded role in managing the New Republic’s growing team, plotting overall editorial strategy, and overseeing the creation of the brand’s journalism.  Kiera Aaron has been named deputy digital editor at Shape and Fitness. She had been senior digital editor at Fitness. Ryan Kearney has been named executive editor for digital at the New Republic. Kearney has been with the brand for three years, first joining in October 2012 as a story editor. Additionally, Ryu Spaeth will be joining as a deputy editor. He’ll oversee the day-to-day operations of the New Republic’s site. Spaeth joins from TheWeek.com, where as a deputy editor he overhauled their site, expanded coverage, and grew their audience. He previously has worked at Time and HarperCollins Publishers.center_img Stacey Wilson Hunt has been named Hollywood editor at New York Magazine. She had been awards and special projects editor at The Hollywood Reporter.  Chelsea Matiash has been named multimedia/photo editor at Time. She had been photo editor at The Wall Street Journal. Kim Caviness has joined Imagination as executive vice president and chief content officer. Caviness will be responsible for leading Imagination’s content organization. She joins Imagination from McMurry/TMG in Washington, D.C., a leading national content strategy firm where she has been chief content officer since 2013. Here are the rest of this week’s people on the move:last_img read more

Can you spot the Mars rover on this wild Red Planet landscape

first_img 0 Mars rovers NASA Space Enlarge ImageTry to spot the Mars rover in this view from orbit. NASA/JPL/University of Arizona NASA’s Curiosity rover loves to send selfies and close-up looks at fascinating rocks and even its own hole-y wheels. But sometimes it gets to pose for a portrait from far, far away. Conditions were just right at the end of May for NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft to capture a snapshot of Curiosity working away in an area called Woodland Bay, part of the intriguing “clay-bearing unit.” The enhanced-color image comes from the MRO’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera, which is operated by the University of Arizona in Tucson. If you’re having trouble spotting the rover, check out NASA’s cropped version of the image that highlights its location.hirisecuriosity2Enlarge ImageThat bluish spec is the Curiosity rover. NASA/JPL-Caltech A close look at the rover shows a bright spot in the upper left-hand corner. This is likely the rover’s “head,” which includes a suite of instruments on the end of a mast. The sun was hitting the rover just right. “Mirror-like reflections off smooth surfaces show up as especially bright spots in HiRISE images,” said NASA in a release on Friday. The clay-rich area Curiosity is exploring now is one of the big reasons NASA chose Curiosity’s landing site in Gale Crater. The rover is studying the history of water on Mars and looking for signs of microbial life, past or present. 41 weird objects seen on Mars, explained Spotting NASA machines on Mars is a bit of hobby for the MRO HiRISE team, which showed us both the InSight lander and the now-defunct Opportunity rover last year. Curiosity is NASA’s only working rover on Mars at the moment, but that’s scheduled to change when the Mars 2020 rover gets its own crack at the Red Planet in 2021. The MRO should be there to keep an eye on Mars’ new visitor. Post a comment Share your voicecenter_img 43 Photos Tags NASA rover sees bewitching night-shining clouds on Mars NASA spots Mars surprise at Curiosity rover work site Sci-Tech Marvelous Marslast_img read more

Researcher issues grave earthquake warning Earth will be jolted by a powerful

first_img[Representational Image]twitterYou can call it coincidence, but for the past couple of months, many earthquake predictions made by self-proclaimed seismic researcher Frank Hoogerbeets have turned true, and his recent forecast on upcoming quakes is capable of sending chills in your spine. In a recent post on his website ‘Ditrianum’, Hoogerbeets has claimed that a powerful earthquake which may measure 7 in the Richter scale could hit the earth either today or tomorrow.”Critical planetary and lunar geometry in the last two days is likely going to trigger large seismic activity from the 10th to the 12th, possibly over 7 magnitudes,” wrote Hoogerbeets on his website.Interestingly, the predictions of Hoogerbeets come at a time when a preliminary magnitude-4.0 earthquake was reported on May 11, in Cleveland. Even though no noted destruction happened in the affected area, the USGS is apparently collecting responses from people who experienced mild tremor in Cleveland. As of now, more than 8,000 people have reported feeling the earthquake, and most of them revealed that the intensity of the quake was weak to light.Hoogerbeets believe that critical planetary alignments and lunar geometry are causing a rise in seismic activities. As per Hoogerbeets, certain planetary alignments have the capability to destabilize the tectonic plates on the earth, and it is resulting in these earthquakes. Hoogerbeets claim that he is using an advanced system named SSGI (Solar System Geometry Index) to predict potential quakes, and he believes that it is one of the most sophisticated tools that can forecast upcoming tremors with precision.In his website post, Hoogerbeets also clarified that it is an electromagnetic force during planetary alignments which is causing the earthquakes. He also added that gravitational pull of the planets is not capable to trigger seismic activities here on earth.”From the beginning, we have stated that the most likely cause is the electromagnetic force, which is a stronger force than gravity. In fact, the gravitational force is the weakest in the Universe and is always dominated by the electromagnetic force,” added Hoogerbeets.Even though Hoogerbeets continue to make wild predictions about possible earthquakes, seismic experts have always dismissed his claims stating that no current technology is capable of predicting future earthquakes.last_img read more

Myanmar closes Rohingya camps

first_imgMuslim residents at Taungpaw an internally displaced people`s camp walk through the flood to reach the new house built by the Myanmar government in central Rakhine. Photo: ReutersAs the world was focused on abortive efforts to begin repatriating hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees from Bangladesh to Myanmar last month, hundreds of their fellow Muslims still in Myanmar were boarding boats seeking to escape the country.Their attempted flight cast the spotlight back on 128,000 Rohingya and other displaced Muslims still living in crowded camps in Myanmar’s western state of Rakhine, six years after Buddhist mobs razed most of their homes.The government of Aung San Suu Kyi, under international pressure to address their plight, says it is now closing the camps on the grounds that doing so will help development and put the labour of camp residents to good use.But Reuters interviews with more than a dozen residents from five camps and internal United Nations documents show the move simply means building new, more permanent homes next to the camps – rather than allowing them to return to the areas from which they fled – leaving their situation little changed.Those that have moved into the new accommodation remain under the same severe movement restrictions as before, residents and staff working in the camps say. A network of official checkpoints and threats of violence by local Buddhists prevent Muslims from moving freely in Rakhine. As a result, those sources say, they are cut off from sources of livelihoods and most services, and reliant on humanitarian handouts.”Yes, we moved to new houses – it’s correct to say (the camp is closed),” said Kyaw Aye, a community leader from a camp called Nidin, in central Rakhine. “But we’ll never be able to stand on our own feet because we can’t go anywhere.”Reuters spoke to displaced Muslims in Rakhine by phone as reporters are denied independent access to the camps.Myanmar’s Minister of Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement Win Myat Aye said the government was working with the United Nations on a national strategy to close camps housing people forced out of their homes by violence in Rakhine and elsewhere, known as internally displaced persons or IDPs.There were no legal restrictions on the movements of displaced people in Rakhine, as long as they accepted a so-called national verification card that also gives them equal access to healthcare and education, he said in a written response to Reuters’ questions.Aid workers and Muslim residents say severe restrictions persist even on those who have accepted the identity card, which most Rohingya reject because they say it treats them as foreigners who have to prove their nationality.The U.N. chief in Myanmar, Knut Ostby, warned in a Sept. 24 private note that the government’s plan for camp closures “risks further entrenching segregation while denying IDPs many of their fundamental human rights”.Ostby’s office declined to comment on the note, but in a written response to Reuters’ questions said the UN had been invited to comment on the government’s plans for closing camps and was preparing its response.That response would include recommendations that all displaced people be granted freedom of movement, were involved in planning their resettlement and could return to their homes or another place of their choosing, Ostby said.MARITIME ESCAPERohingya community leaders say that improving conditions for those still living in Rakhine is one of the keys to persuading the hundreds of thousands sheltering in refugee camps in Bangladesh to return.Some 730,000 fled a military crackdown after attacks by Rohingya militants in August 2017. U.N.-mandated investigators have said the Myanmar military unleashed a campaign of killings, rape and arson with “genocidal intent”. Myanmar has denied almost all the accusations against its troops, who it says engaged in legitimate operations against terrorists.Refugees baulked at a plan for repatriating them that was supposed to begin in mid-November, arguing that conditions were not right for return.Meanwhile, at least three boats, each carrying scores of men, women and children, have departed from Rakhine for Malaysia since monsoon rains abated in October, following the hazardous maritime escape route used for years by Rohingya fleeing what they say is persecution in Myanmar.”If they are making the choice to go by boat, it’s clear proof of the conditions in the IDP camps,” said Khin Maung, a Rohingya youth activist in Bangladesh.He is in touch with fellow Muslims who are “living like prisoners” in the camps in central Rakhine, Khin Maung said. “If they are living like that how can we agree to go back?”Win Myat Aye, the minister, said Myanmar was working to improve the lives of both the IDPs and potential returnees.”I assume that the displaced people are leaving with boats because they (have) not fully understood what we arranged for their accommodations, livelihoods and socio-economic development,” he said.”INVESTING IN SEGREGATION”One camp, among the 18 remaining in Rakhine, lies outside a central Rakhine town of Myebon, which was torn by communal violence in 2012.The 3,000-strong Muslim community was expelled and put in the camp, known as Taungpaw, on a narrow strip between the now Buddhist-only town and the Bay of Bengal, in what was supposed to be a temporary arrangement.This year authorities built 200 new houses on rice paddies next to the camp, despite concerns that the area was prone to flooding. They were inundated in early June. In September, the government also built two new buildings set to become Muslim-only schoolhouses.”This is a sign the Rakhine state government is investing in permanent segregation rather than promoting integration,” said a previously unpublished memo dated Sept. 30 and circulated by U.N. officials setting out the concerns of aid workers operating in the camps. The U.N. said it did not comment on leaked documents.Some Muslims in Myebon have Myanmar citizenship and others have accepted national verification cards. They say they still cannot visit the town, where communal tensions have stayed high since the 2012 violence. Rakhine Buddhists have at times blocked aid deliveries to the camp.”Although they gave people new homes, if there’s still no freedom to move, there’s still no opportunity to do business,” said camp resident Cho Cho, 49.Aung Thar Kyaw, a leader among the Rakhine Buddhist community in Myebon, said the two communities were too different to live together, labelling Muslims “so aggressive”.”The government already built them new homes so they don’t need to enter town,” he said.Lei Lei Aye, an official in the Ministry of Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement, referred questions about the specific concerns in Taungpaw to Rakhine state government officials, who could not be reached for comment.”POLICY OF APARTHEID”Despite the humanitarian community’s efforts to convince Myanmar to change course, including by giving technical advice on camp closures, “the only scenario that is unfolding before our eyes is the implementation of a policy of apartheid with the permanent segregation of all Muslims, the vast majority of whom are stateless Rohingya, in central Rakhine,” said an internal “discussion note” prepared by the U.N.’s refugee agency in late September, first reported by Frontier Myanmar magazine and reviewed by Reuters.Win Myat Aye said he was “not concerned” about such warnings because the government was progressing with its camp closure strategy in consultation with UN agencies, non-governmental groups and foreign diplomats.The UN estimates humanitarian assistance in Rakhine will cost about $145 million next year.Former residents of Nidin, about 100 km (62 miles) north of Taungpaw, told Reuters their situation had barely improved since state media declared the camp closed in August.They are unable to return to Kyauktaw, the town where many lived and worked before the 2012 violence.Tun Wai, a Rakhine Buddhist doctor in Kyauktaw, said Muslims could “go freely outside the town”. But if they try to return, he said, “they will be killed”.Soe Lwin, deputy chief of the Kyauktaw police station, said Muslims “can’t enter the town”, but denied they would meet with violence. “We have the rule of law,” he said.The Muslims now live marooned among rice paddies that do not belong to them. Rohingya fishermen say what they catch barely covers their rental costs as they do not own their equipment.And with no clean water supply, children have contracted skin rashes from washing in agricultural run-off.”We can’t even support our children because we don’t have income,” said former camp resident Khin Hla, 43. “Without aid, we would starve.”last_img

Worker dies after shot by ward commissioners nephew

first_imgA worker was shot dead by the nephew of a ward commissioner of the capital in Sialdi village of Sirajdikhan upazila in Munshiganj on Monday, reports UNB.The deceased is Obaidul Islam, 32, son of Munsar Ali of Bajradiakhata village of Chilmari upazila.Additional police superintendent Mostafizur Rahman said after the incident the key accused Ismail Molla, and his uncle Shamim Molla, commissioner of ward No 26 of Tejgaon in the capital were on the run.Pranbondhu, inspector of police Special Branch said Shamim Molla gave his personal pistol to his nephew Ismail on Monday night. Ismail and his wife were looking at it after taking it into their hands.Ismail accidentally pressed the trigger which hit the worker on his throat leaving him severely injured.Later, the victim succumbed to his injuries after being taken to the Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH).Officer-in-charge of Sirajdikhan police station the body was sent morgue for autopsy.They also arrested Ismail Molla’s wife for interrogation, he said.last_img read more

Hispanic evangelical group offers to house migrant children in churches

first_img By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! About the authorView All Posts By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Share This! News • Photos of the Week By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Share This! Emily McFarlan Miller Emily McFarlan Miller is a national reporter for RNS based in Chicago. She covers evangelical and mainline Protestant Christianity. Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 News Catholicism By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkinscenter_img Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Share This! Tagsborder crisis child migrant crisis Hispanic evangelicals homepage featured immigration Top Story,You may also like Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — The head of the largest Hispanic evangelical Christian network in the United States announced it will offer to work with the Trump administration to provide resources and shelter to migrant children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border.Speaking during a call with reporters Monday (July 1), the Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, said his organization plans to launch a campaign to offer aid to immigrant children held in detention centers at the border.The effort, which organizers are calling the “For His Children” campaign, will involve sending “shipments and cargo and truckloads of resources to the border,” including shoes, clothing and hygiene products, Rodriguez said.“We have boots on the ground literally now working with our current administration in addressing some of the needs of these children coming over,” he said.When a Religion News Service reporter asked if the campaign would involve churches providing shelter or foster homes for migrant children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, Rodriguez said yes.“That’s part of what we have in the rollout of the campaign,” he said. “It’s part of it.”The Rev. Samuel Rodriguez in 2013. Courtesy photoIt was not immediately clear how many — or which — children the group might be able to take in. No details were available about what kind of government approval the process would require. It was also not clear whether the children would be housed just in churches or also in homes.The Kairos Company, the communications firm that organized the call, told RNS churches who participate in the program plan to offer housing to children who would otherwise end up in detention centers, but noted they have not yet secured approval from the U.S. government to do so.“In the meantime the churches will provide the necessary basic necessities and we are opening up churches to accommodate just in case the detention centers cannot hold the children or their families,” a spokesperson said in an email. “The church becomes a temporary housing facility for those seeking asylum or coming over the border undocumented and were captured in the process.”The spokesperson also noted that the initiative will be led by the NHCLC, but not limited to their network.RNS also asked the U.S. State Department about the potential program, but they deferred to the Department of Homeland Security, who also did not immediately respond. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services — which assists with similar programs — also did not immediately respond to request for comment.Rodriguez said For His Children is “revamping” a previous partnership with the humanitarian organization Convoy of Hope. That partnership began in July 2014 when unaccompanied children arrived in the U.S. under former President Obama.The NHCLC president listed as potential partners Gus Reyes, director of the Baptist General Convention of Texas’ Christian Life Commission, and Rev. Eli Bonilla, lead pastor at Bethel Christian Church in Orlando, Florida.“Our preferable choice is for people to come here legally, not illegally. We want to stop all illegal immigration for a number of reasons, including the humanitarian reason. My heart broke when I saw these kids. I don’t want these kids to be in danger or to suffer at all,” Rodriguez said.“If they do come here, we want to be a blessing to them. We really want to help them.”Still, he said, he saw something “drastically different from the stories I’ve been hearing in our national discourse” when he requested a visit to a detention facility last week in El Paso, Texas.“I was shocked at the misinformation of the crisis at the border.”He and a delegation of pastors from the NHCLC had full access to the facility, which they toured for at least an hour, he said.It appeared to be a “summer camp environment” where children had television and snacks and cordial relationships with guards, Rodriguez said. No one was sleeping on floors or cement, and storage areas were full of clothing and hygiene products.People protest against U.S. immigration policies on the American side, right, of the Mexico-America border near Tijuana on Dec. 10, 2018. RNS photo by Jair Cabrera TorresRodriguez said guards emphatically told him they had not altered the center for the visit but acknowledged he was not allowed to speak with the children.James Dobson, the founder of Focus on the Family, similarly grabbed headlines last week with a newsletter documenting his visit to the border at McAllen, Texas, alleging “the media and leftist politicians have not been truthful about what is going on there.”Both Rodriguez and Dobson are represented by The Kairos Company.The Evangelical Immigration Table also visited the U.S.-Mexico border in late June, as revelations about the dire conditions of children within detention centers made the news. Its delegation included the National Association of Evangelicals President Leith Anderson and World Relief President Scott Arbeiter, as well as representatives of Bethany Christian Services, the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities and the Assemblies of God.The NHCLC is a member of the Evangelical Immigration Table.Afterward, the Evangelical Immigration Table sent a letter addressed to President Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, Senate Leader Mitch McConnell, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and members of Congress.That letter asks for immediate funding for border facilities, urges the U.S. to respect its own laws regarding asylum seekers and expressed concern about Trump’s so-called “Remain in Mexico” program.In a recorded press call about the letter, Anderson said there are churches throughout the U.S. that are “eager to welcome families and provide for them.“We just need federal policies that would allow them to be able to do that,” he said.Anderson also asked Congress to “find a bipartisan solution to this tragic situation.”One issue preventing churches and faith-based agencies from helping asylum seekers is the “Remain in Mexico” program, which is sending asylum seekers back over the border to Mexico while they wait for their cases to be heard in U.S. immigration court, according to Matthew Soerens, national coordinator of the Evangelical Immigration Table and U.S. director of church mobilization for World Relief.Another issue is that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has run out of resources to place children with agencies like Bethany Christian Services that are authorized to provide foster care for children until they can be reunited with family, Soerens said.Also, churches would need government approval and oversight to take in children. Not just anyone can show up and offer to foster a migrant child who has been separated from his or her family at the border, he confirmed — and that’s “for good reason.”He added, “You have to protect children.” Share This! Norman Geisler, theologian and prolific author, dies at 86 Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Jack Jenkins Jack Jenkins is a national reporter for RNS based in Washington, covering U.S. Catholics and the intersection of religion and politics.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Iraqi refugee in New Mexico leaves church sanctuary after two years As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Photos of the Week August 30, 2019last_img read more

Bootstrap 5 to replace jQuery with vanilla JavaScript

first_imgThe upcoming major version of Bootstrap, version 5, will no longer have jQuery as a dependency and will be replaced with vanilla JavaScript. In 2017, the Bootstrap team opened a pull request with the aim to remove jQuery entirely from the Bootstrap source and it is now near completion. Under this pull request, the team has removed jQuery from 11 plugins including Util, Alert, Button, Carousel, and more. Using ‘Data’ and ‘EventHandler’ in unit tests is no longer supported. Additionally, Internet Explorer will not be compatible with this version. Despite these updates, developers will be able to use this version both with or without jQuery. Since this will be a major release, users can expect a few breaking changes. Not only just Bootstrap but many other companies have been thinking of decoupling from jQuery. For example, last year, GitHub incrementally removed jQuery from their frontend mainly because of the rapid evolution of web standards and jQuery losing its relevancy over time. This news triggered a discussion on Hacker News, and many users were happy about this development. One user commented, “I think the reason is that many of the problems jQuery was designed to solve (DOM manipulation, cross-browser compatibility issues, AJAX, cool effects) have now been implemented as standards, either in Javascript or CSS and many developers consider the 55k minified download not worth it.” Another user added, “The general argument now is that 95%+ of jQuery is now native in browsers (with arguably the remaining 5% being odd overly backward compatible quirks worth ignoring), so adding a JS dependency for them is “silly” and/or a waste of bandwidth.” Read more in detail, check out Bootstrap’s GitHub repository. Read Next jQuery File Upload plugin exploited by hackers over 8 years, reports Akamai’s SIRT researcher GitHub parts ways with JQuery, adopts Vanilla JS for its frontend Will putting limits on how much JavaScript is loaded by a website help prevent user resource abuse?last_img read more

Announcing Wireshark 300

first_imgYesterday, Wireshark released its version 3.0.0 with new user interface improvements, bug fixes, new Npcap Windows Packet capturing driver and more. Wireshark, the open source and cross-platform network protocol analysis software is used by security analysts, experts and developers for analysis, troubleshooting, development, and other security-related tasks to capture and browse the packets traffic on computer networks. Features of Wireshark 3.0.0 The Windows .exe installers replaces WinPcap with Npcap. Npcap supports loopback capture and 802.11 WiFi monitor mode capture – only if supported by the NIC driver. The “Map-Button” of the Endpoint dialog that was erased since Wireshark Version 2.6.0 has been added in a modernized form. The macOS package ships with Qt 5.12.1 and the OS requires version 10.12 or later. Initial support has been provided for using PKCS #11 tokens for RSA decryption in TLS. Configure this at Preferences, RSA Keys. The new WireGuard dissector has decryption support and requires Libgcrypt 1.8 for the same. You can now copy coloring rules, IO graphs, filter Buttons and protocol preference tables from other profiles using a button in the corresponding configuration dialogs. Wireshark now supports Swedish, Ukrainian and Russian language. A new dfilter function string() has been added which allows the conversion of non-string fields to strings. This enables string functions to be used on them. The legacy (GTK+) user interface, the portaudio library are removed and no longer supported. Wireshark requires Qt 5.2 or later, GLib 2.32 or later, GnuTLS 3.2 or later as optional dependency. Building Wireshark requires Python 3.4 or a newer version. Data following a TCP ZeroWindowProbe is not passed to subdissectors and is marked as retransmission. Head over to Wireshark’s official blog for the entire list of upgraded features in this release. Read Next Using statistical tools in Wireshark for packet analysis [Tutorial]Wireshark for analyzing issues and malicious emails in POP, IMAP, and SMTP [Tutorial]Analyzing enterprise application behavior with Wireshark 2last_img read more