Richards-Porter Happy Earning From Chess

first_imgWhile some Jamaicans may not earn a comfortable living from their professional sporting pursuits, Woman International Chess Master Deborah Richards-Porter says that chess has taken her places and has given her a business from which she can live comfortably. Richards-Porter is the first Woman International Chess Master in the English-speaking Caribbean. Besides playing the sport she loves, she operates her own business, teaching chess to over 100 students. It is set up at different schools, while during summer and Christmas holidays, she has specific programmes tailored for her clients. “I have a chess business; I have chess as a profession, and seasonal programme for students who are interested in learning every day,” Richards Porter told The Gleaner. “You can make a decent living from chess, because I graduated from the University of the West Indies (UWI). I was doing research, and I stopped it to come and teach chess,” she outlined. Like most things, however, the flag-bearer says it depends on who you are and how you go about marketing and doing it. “It (chess) takes up a lot of my time, most of my life is chess right now, and working is more fun than work for me,” she reasoned. NOT ENOUGH RECOGNITION According to the veteran, Jamaicans need recognise chess as a sport. “No, I would not say I have gotten adequate recognition as a player. I think most people don’t know what is happening in and round chess. More has to be done from our side in terms of pushing sports that are not track and field and football so that we can get our recognition,” she underlined. The player began her career at 16 and described it as kind of a coincidence” how she started, as she was a former table tennis player. “Seven months after playing, I became national champion, and about a month after that, I was on my first plane ride going to Slovenia to play the chess Olympiad at the time,” she continued. Richards Porter added, “I found out within the first year that chess could take me places.” She has represented Jamaica at five Chess Olympiads, dating 2006, 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2016. She was named the RJR Sports Foundation Woman Chess Player of the Year. – S.F.last_img read more

Blaming Piracy, Music Industry Says It’s Lost a Third of Its Value Over Past 7 Years

first_imgIt’s a familiar refrain from the music industry: revenue is down and piracy is to blame. That’s the gist of the the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry‘s (IFPI) annual Digial Music Report, which points to a slowdown in the growth of digital music sales. While digital music revenue has grown 1,000% over the past seven years, the entire music industry has lost a third of its value over that same time period. And while digital music seems to represent both the best hopes and the worst fears of the industry, even its growth is slowing – only 6% last year, down from 9.2% growth in 2009. Digital sales comprise about a third of the industry’s total revenue.Pirates (Not Inflexible Business Models) Are to Blame“While record companies are innovating and licensing every viable form of music access for consumers,” says IFPI chief executive Frances Moore, “the music industry is still haemorrhaging revenue as a result of digital piracy.” Moore labels this “a crisis affecting not just an industry – but artists, musicians, jobs, consumers, and the wider creative sector.” This sort of rhetoric – “crisis,” “haemorrhage,” “the need for rule of law on the Internet” – isn’t new for the music industry. But the report does say that in 2010 governments, at the industry’s urging, seemed more willing to take action to crack down on music piracy. The report points to the closure of the file-sharing site Limewire and blockage of Pirate Bay in Italy and Denmark as positive efforts.Will Subscription Services Save the Industry?The report also pins its hopes on the growth of subscription services, arguing that the rise of these alternatives has been driven by consumer demand for digital music. The report says that 2010 “broke the seal” on subscription services, as these became more widely available – on more devices, in more locations. But as the report notes, licensing issues remain a challenge.Those licensing issues have been an obstacle to companies seeking to offer legitimate subscription services. Most notably, Spotify has had to delay its launch in the U.S. because of difficulties striking deals with the major music labels.But it’s piracy, not licensing, that the IFPI cites as the major obstacle to a thriving music industry, citing job losses and “victimized” developing artists. Addressing this, according to the report, is the government’s responsibility, and it argues that as such it can “turn the tide against piracy in 2011.” Tags:#music#NYT#web audrey watters Related Posts 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe Appcenter_img 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

Girl Eats Bug

first_imgNutritional value: off the chartsOur main animal protein sources are pigs, chickens, cows and fish, with each animal and cut of meat providing a unique nutritional profile. According to Daniella, the same is true in the insect world. The flavors vary incredibly from red ants to silk worm pupae to crickets to grasshoppers, and so does nutritional value.Per 100 grams of lean beef, you can get 27.4 grams of protein and 3.5 mg of iron. The same quantity of caterpillars would give you 28.2 grams of protein and 35.5 mg of iron, with little fat. Crickets offer 12.9 grams of protein, 5.5 grams of fat, 5.1 grams of carbs, and an incredible 75.8 mg of calcium. As you can see, it’s not just about protein, as people commonly think.According to Martin, athletes and body builders who eat “scientifically” are very predisposed to insects, because of the variety of nutritional value offered, and the fact that it’s packaged as a whole food, not just an isolated supplement. Efficiency at converting feed to foodInsects are much more efficient than other forms of livestock at converting food and water into edible body mass. Says Daniella, “Many commonly farmed insect species require several times less food, 100 times less land space, and 1,000 times less water than beef to create the same amount of food.” While cows spend a lot of their energy just staying warm, insects are ectotherms, or cold-blooded creatures. Insects contribute far fewer greenhouse gases like methane to the atmosphere than livestock do, and don’t require deforestation or other development. Cattle-farming, by contrast, is the cause of 70% of deforestation, according to common figures, and is a larger contributor to global warming than driving cars.Bugs require so little space that an insect farm can be started in a closet or an old 55-gallon drum, and insects can be raised on food that people throw away: leaves, food scraps, and bran, for example.While our common livestock are stressed out and made sick by factory-farming conditions, insects are accustomed to being raised in tight quarters, and can be farmed in great density without apparent stress. As ectotherms, they are killed by cold temperatures. Daniella puts insects she farms or traps into a jar in the freezer (saying a brief prayer, she notes), killing them. They then come out of the freezer and into the frying pan, oven, or wok.I stopped by the local outdoor outfitters today for a butterfly net — they didn’t have one, but they did sell me a finely meshed fishing net. While she’s visiting us, Daniella is hoping to use it to catch some local grasshoppers or crickets, which she says you can treat pretty much like shrimp. I am hoping to get over the “ew” factor. How about you?Update: I got over it. Sauteed, local grasshoppers are great! And waxmoth larvae make a great snack.Tristan Roberts is Editorial Director at BuildingGreen, Inc., in Brattleboro, Vermont, which publishes information on green building solutions.Note: I hope that GBA readers enjoyed this week’s jaunt away from the built environment. You can’t say you didn’t ask for it, AJ. (See my recent post on Utility Wind Energy: Bad News for Bears). Did we evolve to eat bugs?Daniella is convinced that this “cultural thing” goes against our nature: insects are “a deeply native food.” She asked, “If you think of primates using their first tools, what do you think of?” I thought of of chimps using sticks to get termites out of their nests, and then devour them. Daniella describes herself as someone with food issues — lactose-intolerant, allergic to alcohol, but she has never had a problem eating insects. “It feels from an organic level that we are biologically evolved to eat bugs,” she says.If you don’t feel that you were evolved to dip into some grubs, there are some other reasons why you might consider it. Introducing entomophagy: Eating insectsA growing number of people are trying to introduce a new concept, however: entomophagy, for entomo- (insects) plus -phagy (eat). Yes, they are suggesting that we should purposefully eat insects as food, and that there are good ethical, environmental, nutritional, and culinary reasons for doing so.I had the chance this week to talk with Daniella Martin, host of the website GirlMeetsBug.com, and a leading teacher and promoter of the topic. Although it’s difficult to know for sure, Daniella quotes a common estimate that 80% of the world practices insect-eating — and as a delicacy, not just “famine food.” Why, I asked her, are Americans so squeamish about something that is so commonly accepted elsewhere?“Every culture has its identity,” she told me. “For Muslims, not eating pork is part of their identity — for Hindus, not eating beef. For most Americans, by the time we are 9 or 10 years old we don’t even remember where we got the idea that bugs are gross. It’s simply part of our cultural identity to not eat bugs.” The Large Blue Butterfly, found in Europe, lays its eggs on a marsh gentian leaf. Its larva (a caterpillar) hatches and falls to the ground and emits a scent that smells to certain species of ant just like its own larvae. The ants carry the caterpillar back to their nest, where they not only care for it as one of their own, but as one of their own that is going to turn into a queen. Meanwhile, the caterpillar is eating the actual ant larvae and growing large.Enter the ichneumon wasp, which can somehow detect ant colonies that have been invaded in this way. The wasp flies into the ant colony and sprays a pheromone that causes the ants to attack each other. In the melee, the wasp finds the caterpillar in the larval chamber and injects its own eggs into the caterpillar. Those eggs later hatch during the butterfly’s chrysalis stage, consuming it from the inside and later coming forth as wasps.Interactions like these between ants and other species are so common that there is a word for them: myrmecophily.Interactions between Americans and insects are also very common, and are known by the following words: gross, EEW!, splat, and squish.last_img read more