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News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more November 18, 2010 – A breast imaging software for use with digital mammography has received clearance from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA).Automatically computing volumetric breast tissue density from screening mammograms, Volpara software assists radiologists by providing objective, automatic and robust measurement of volumetric breast tissue density. Cleared for use with digital mammography systems, Volpara is currently available for Hologic and GE digital mammography systems, with other systems undergoing validation. Volpara, a subsidiary of Matakina Technology Ltd. of New Zealand, is responsible for commercial operations in the United States. Breast tissue density has not only been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, it also decreases the sensitivity of the mammogram and thereby may impact early detection. Several large studies have confirmed that as tissue density increases, the accuracy of mammography decreases. Since both dense breast tissue and cancer appear white on a mammogram, finding cancers can be analogous to looking for a snowball in a snow storm.Radiologists currently use the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) system to classify density. Developed by the American College of Radiology, the density assessment ranges from Category 1 (mostly fat) to Category 4 (extremely dense). However, the density category assessment is subjective and varies widely among interpreting physicians, even those who are experienced. Automated, objective, volumetric density assessments, consistently applied, has the potential both for establishing a new and important metric for mammography and for allowing physicians to compare a patient’s volumetric density from year to year.“With the ability to objectively and accurately measure breast density, we can look at screening women with low and high densities differently rather than one-size-fits-all universal screening programs. For example, it may be a good idea for women with very dense breasts to receive ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in addition to mammography as part of regular screening. In the future, it may be possible by lowering breast density to reduce breast cancer risk. In this case, it would be helpful to monitor this process by tracking changes in breast density over time,” said Martin J. Yaffe, Ph.D., of the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, a renowned physicist responsible for pioneering work on quantitative breast imaging. Using digital images and information captured in every mammographic exam, Volpara applies an algorithm developed by some of the world’s top imaging scientists, using new developments in imaging physics. For more information: www.volparadensity.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related Content The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. News | November 18, 2010 FDA Clears Breast Imaging Software for Calculating Density News | Breast Imaging | August 02, 2019 Volpara to Distribute Screenpoint Medical’s Transpara AI Solution Volpara Solutions and ScreenPoint Medical BV signed an agreement under which Volpara will sell ScreenPoint’s Transpara… read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019 Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021 August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative read more

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