Rolls-Royce, Google Join Forces on Making Autonomous Ships a Reality

first_imgRolls-Royce has inked a deal with Google to develop further its intelligent awareness systems which are believed to make existing vessels safer and are essential for autonomous ships to become a reality.The agreement, said to be the first of its kind in the marine sector, was signed at the Google Cloud Summit in Sweden on October 3. It allows Rolls-Royce to use Google’s Cloud Machine Learning Engine to further train the company’s artificial intelligence (AI) based object classification system for detecting, identifying and tracking the objects a vessel can encounter at sea.“While intelligent awareness systems will help to facilitate an autonomous future, they can benefit maritime businesses right now making vessels and their crews safer and more efficient. By working with Google Cloud we can make these systems better faster, saving lives,” Karno Tenovuo, Rolls-Royce, SVP Ship Intelligence, commented.As disclosed, Rolls-Royce will use Google Cloud’s software to create machine learning models which can interpret large and diverse marine data sets created by Rolls-Royce. Data will be prepared to train models, ensuring that it is relevant and in sufficient quantity to create statistical significance. As part of the machine learning process, the models’ predictions are evaluated in practical marine applications, allowing the models to be further refined.By accessing this software through the Cloud, the models can be developed from anywhere in the world and are immediately accessible globally allowing thousands of users. Models can, therefore, be trained on large quantities (terabytes) of data. This will be essential as autonomous ships become commonplace.In the longer term, Rolls-Royce and Google intend to undertake joint research on unsupervised and multimodal learning. The two companies will also test whether speech recognition and synthesis are viable solutions for human-machine interfaces in marine applications. They will also work on optimizing the performance of local neural network computing on board ships using open source machine intelligence software libraries such as Google’s TensorFlow.Intelligent awareness systems are expected to make vessels safer, easier and more efficient to operate by providing crew with an enhanced understanding of their vessel’s surroundings. This will be achieved by fusing data from a range of sensors with information from existing ship systems, such as Automatic Identification System (AIS) and radar. Data from other sources, including global databases, will also have a role, Rolls-Royce said.last_img read more

Ponting fears Khawaja’s Test career may be over

first_imgRICKY Ponting believes it will be “difficult” for Usman Khawaja to force his way back into the Australia Test side.Khawaja was a notable absentee when Cricket Australia announced its list of centrally contracted players last month.The 33-year-old batsman has not played for his country since the drawn Ashes series in England last year and Marnus Labuschagne has looked very much at home at number three.Former Australia captain Ponting thinks we may have seen the last of Khawaja in the longest format, despite the left-hander saying he believes he is among the top six batsmen in the country.Ponting told ABC Grandstand: “I honestly think now he’s going to find it difficult [to regain his place] and I feel for him.“I love Usman Khawaja, I got really close to him over the last 10 years since he made his debut and I talk to him quite regularly.“I’ve always felt he’s a very good player and we probably never saw the absolute best of him at international cricket.“We saw glimpses of it, and dribs and drabs, but not the consistently good player I thought he could have been for Australia.”(Omnisport)last_img read more