Letters to the Editor

first_imgPaper again shows bias against TrumpI see your editor is at it again. What‘s the bold headline on the Opinion page? “Surprise! Trump Foundation is a Sham.”Well, now we know for sure Trump is just a scamster.To be fair, I expected to see directly below this headline another one just as bold: “Surprise! Clinton Foundation is a Sham.” Whenever I talk about my project, I am always proud to say a fellow Niskayuna resident first presented information about the solar pollinator garden legislation to my town government.Building off my troop’s previous pollinator garden project completed with Highway Department leaders two years earlier at the request of another resident, Niskayuna master gardener Kathy Harter provided the spark I needed to undertake this endeavor. Finally, I want to thank my hometown newspaper. The Gazette’s coverage of my efforts — and the new Gold Award Girl Scout scholarship I am launching — helps further my goal of increasing awareness of Girl Scouting at the highest levels. Caroline McGrawNiskayuna Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionShutdown does a disservice to citizensThis government shutdown is dereliction of duty on the part of Congress and the president. Their job is to provide the governmental services that our taxes pay for. I think a group of citizens should sue in federal court to get our services back. You just don’t shut down a government. That’s like shutting off the car engine while you’re going down the highway.Art HombachSchenectady Many helped with Girl Scout projectRecently, I was one of 10 girls in the country named National Gold Award Girl Scout for my efforts to combat food insecurity by increasing pollinator populations through planting gardens at solar arrays; securing state funding for research; and successfully advocating for long stalled legislation. Since no accomplishment this big could be achieved alone, I did not want the year to end without publicly thanking everyone who supported me.From my troop leader since kindergarten, Liz Yanoff, and council mentor Allison Marinucci, to the middle school girls who planted seeds with me, I am very grateful for the Niskayuna Scouting community. Former Supervisor Joe Landry cultivated the idea for the solar gardens, much the same way he always helped Boy Scouts exploring Eagle Scout projects. Assemblyman Phil Steck guided me through the legislative process.  Imagine my surprise when I didn’t see it. Could your editor be so one-sided? Apparently so. It’s one thing to print every letter you get, representing the opinions of the populace.But when you choose which editorial articles to pull from the thousands available that day, and invariably pick anti-Trump ones, that says a lot about your views and your fairness.Let me help; your views are liberal, and your fairness doesn’t exist. Hillary’s foundation dealt with hundreds of millions of dollars, including massive ‘donations’ from nefarious origins, with the Clinton’s themselves being the largest charity receiving payouts. I’d appreciate it if you would make some attempt, even a small one, to print a balanced set of viewpoints.If you can’t find conservative ones, let me know.Bill DenisonBurnt HillsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Discussion highlights space law

first_imgThe USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism hosted a panel in the Gould School of Law Wednesday afternoon to discuss legal policies and actions surrounding space travel.The event was organized by Alex Kaplan, a second year student in the USC Gould School of Law and president of USC’s Space Law Society.Rita Lauria, a professor at Annenberg and the founder of the legal firm Metalaw®.US, Julie Jiru, an attorney at SpaceX and Matthew Schaefer, a professor at the University of Nebraska served as panelists at the discussion on the future of space law as a legal field.Space law is becoming increasingly important as more and more private companies invest in the space travel industry. SpaceX’s goal, for example, is to eventually enable people to live on other planets, according to its website.Though all three panelists spoke on the same subject, each had a different perspective and area of expertise.Jiru discussed the Space Act Agreement, a law that enabled the development of the fledging space transportation industry that exists today. Prior to 2004, collaboration between the government and private space firms was possible but, according to Jiru, was limited by the government’s Federal Acquisition Regulation contracts, which  placed too much stress on young space companies.“[A] Federal Acquisition Regulation contract is anywhere from 100 pages to 1000 pages, some are 2000 pages, some are 3000 pages, and it goes on,” Jiru said. “If you’ve worked with a FAR-based contract, you go by the mantra that you are not allowed to launch your launch vehicle unless your contractual paperwork is as heavy as that vehicle that you are trying to lift.”Though legislation around space travel has since changed, companies interested in launching a spacecraft still face many liabilities.“When it comes to third party liability, the current U.S. regime is this: The U.S. government requires the space operator to get insurance up to the maximum probable loss,” Schaeffer said. “The [Federal Aviation Administration] has a way that they calculate through a complex formula.”Schaefer argued that government inaction and indecision, particularly in promising insurance coverage, was creating an unhealthy climate within the space industry.“The government promises to take care of the next $2.7 billion, but it would take an active Congress and an actual appropriation to do it,” Schaeffer said. “Here is the bad thing: Congress has started promising that [amount] for lesser and lesser periods of time. That is tough on the industry for planning purposes.”Exploration · Matthew Schaefer, professor at the University of Nebraska, lectured on the liabilities associated with space travel. – Ralf Cheung | Daily TrojanAnother segment of space law, known as metalaw, looks at framing international law in the event of contact with extraterrestrial intelligent life.“Metalaw seeks to establish a regulatory scheme for outer space that considers the possible existence of other intelligent life and that could be used to help regulate interactions between such possible life forms,” Lauria said.Though metalaw focuses only on possibilities and not actuality, Lauria argued that the speed of technological advances and the slow pace of the legal response necessitated the urgency to speed the process to start considering actuality.Even though the event was specifically about space law, some students saw it as an opportunity to learn more about law in general.“From an undergraduate perspective, this was a good opportunity to get exposure to law, not to mention space law,” said Mabel Tsui, a senior majoring in communication. “Based on the information I have heard, it seems this is a fast-growing area of law.” Follow us on Twitter @dailytrojanlast_img read more

GAIRMSCOIL CHÚ ULADH 5K THIS FRIDAY

first_imgGAIRMSCOIL CHÚ ULADH is holding its 5k this Friday.There’s also a mile event for the less well trained!Registration is from 11am….a nice way to start the Easter holidays.  GAIRMSCOIL CHÚ ULADH 5K THIS FRIDAY was last modified: April 8th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img