Daniel Cormier suffers brutal torn cornea after having his eye poked by Miocic at UFC 252

first_img LIVE TV Adil Khan 3 weeks ago UFC reporter Laura Sanko’s home surrounded by nearly 400 police officers: Watch Stipe Miocic and Daniel Cormier settled their in-ring feud at UFC 252, where the UFC heavyweight champion came out victorious and won the epic trilogy – 2-1. Though the fight had some jaw-dropping moments, it also featured some inadvertent low blows and eye pokes from both brawlers. Cormier made accidental contact in the first round which caused the fight to pause as the champ recovered. However, in the third round, the same thing happened to Daniel Cormier which turned the fight. An unwitting poke by Stipe Miocic affected DC’s vision and the former champion was heard saying that he “can’t see” from his left eye. In the end, Stipe Miocic retained his heavyweight title via a unanimous decision (49–46, 49–46, 48–47). COMMENT SUBSCRIBE TO US “That’ll be it for me.”Thank you for everything, @DC_MMA. #UFC252 pic.twitter.com/TZCOzJf7sN— UFC (@ufc) August 16, 2020 Also Read l How to watch UFC 252 live in India? UFC 252 Miocic vs Cormier 3 live stream India detailsMiocic vs Cormier 3: Daniel Cormier announces his retirementAfter the fight, Daniel Cormier talked to Joe Rogan and announced his retirement. Cormier said that at this point in his career, he is only interested in title fights and he doesn’t see one in his future. Cormier noted he had a good and long run, before calling Miocic vs Cormier 3 ‘a great fight’. “I don’t imagine there’s going to be a title in the future, so that will be it for me. I’ve had a long run. It’s been great. I just fought my last fight for a heavyweight championship. It was a pretty good fight,” said Daniel Cormier while signing off. 3 weeks ago Votto’s double in 10th lifts Reds over streaking Royals 6-5 3 weeks ago Daniel Cormier’s before-and-after video reveals dramatic weight loss ahead of UFC 252 First Published: 17th August, 2020 17:35 IST “Daniel Cormier suffered a torn cornea last night, Cormier told me this morning. No timetable yet for recovery. Doctors said he won’t need surgery just yet but they have to monitor how it heals before knowing for sure. He was discharged from the hospital late Saturday night,” wrote Ariel Helwani. Last Updated: 17th August, 2020 17:35 IST Daniel Cormier Suffers Brutal Torn Cornea After Having His Eye Poked By Miocic At UFC 252 In third round, Stipe Miocic accidentally poked Daniel Cormier’s eye which interrupted his vision. It was later revealed that DC suffered a torn cornea. Written By Also Read l UFC News: Khabib plans training for UFC 254 bout against Justin Gaethje outside the USImage credits: UFC/Twitter “TIL I DIE” 🏆🐐 Stipe Miocic is the greatest heavyweight of all-time! #UFC252 pic.twitter.com/m5Xu2mxxsT— UFC (@ufc) August 16, 2020 FOLLOW US WE RECOMMEND Also Read l UFC News: Cormier’s before-and-after video reveals dramatic weight loss ahead of UFC 252 Also Read l UFC 252 live stream details, how to watch Miocic vs Cormier 3 live?Miocic vs Cormier 3: Daniel Cormier suffers horror torn corneaJournalist Ariel Helwani took to Twitter this week and revealed that Daniel Cormier suffered a torn cornea after having his eye accidentally poked by Stipe Miocic. Helwani claimed Daniel Cormier will not be needing surgery, but doctors will keep monitoring his left eye. Daniel Cormier was reportedly taken to the hospital after the fight and was discharged a couple of hours later. 3 weeks ago UFC 252 live stream details, how to watch Miocic vs Cormier 3 live? 3 weeks ago White Sox break through early, beat Tigers 8-4 WATCH US LIVElast_img read more

Yahoo Picks Week 5: NFL DFS lineup advice for GPP tournaments

first_imgIt’s 2019, and our Week 5 Yahoo daily fantasy football GPP lineup is going to prominently feature Andy Dalton and the Bengals. No, this isn’t a trip back in time — it’s just a juicy matchup with the Cardinals. A Bengals stack, including Auden Tate as a value sleeper, provides some room for big names to fill out this lineup. We have four studs in Dalvin Cook, JuJu Smith-Schuster, Zach Ertz and Michael Thomas to help dominate NFL DFS tournaments.Week 4 was a weird week for fantasy scoring, but we put together a decent lineup. Kyler Murray saved his day with a rushing touchdown, but in general we were wrong that Arizona’s offense would function well against Seattle. Austin Ekeler and Will Dissly were the two obvious plays that faced too high of ownership to carry a GPP lineup, but at least they both delivered. After a slow start, so did Cooper Kupp. MORE WEEK 5 DFS: Stacks | Values | Lineup builderFLEX Michael Thomas, Saints vs. Buccaneers ($29). This game should have a ton of passing yards if Bucs-Rams in Week 4 is any indication. Teddy Bridgewater doesn’t throw downfield a lot, so Thomas should get bombarded with short passes and wind up with a double-digit catch performance.D/ST Oakland Raiders vs. Bears in London ($10). We had to pay down here to fit the rest of this lineup together. Oakland’s defense isn’t strong, but a matchup with Chase Daniel across the pond has some potential for a few turnovers and maybe a sloppy game overall. WEEK 5 NON-PPR RANKINGS:Quarterback | Running back | Wide receiver | Tight end | D/ST | KickerNFL DFS Week 5: Yahoo GPP Lineup PicksQB Andy Dalton, Bengals vs. Cardinals ($29). The Red Rifle better be locked and loaded for this one because the Cardinals’ defense has allowed at least 300 yards passing in three of their first four games. Dalton’s had a surprisingly good start to the season without A.J. Green, and he has an interestingly inflated price this week, which should push down his ownership.RB Dalvin Cook, Vikings @ Giants ($40). Sometimes, you have to play the highest-priced player on the slate. Cook was shut down by the Bears, as expected, but no one else has been able to slow down Minnesota’s workhorse. The Giants won’t slow him down, either, and he might see the highest volume of touches on the slate, too.WEEK 5 PPR RANKINGS: Running back | Wide receiver | Tight endRB Ronald Jones, Buccaneers @ Saints ($13). This backfield is kind of like throwing darts, but Jones just keeps looking good when given opportunities. The Bucs will probably prioritize passing, but Jones should get a few cracks at the end zone.WR Tyler Boyd, Bengals vs. Cardinals ($21). With Ross out, we’re still going to stick with the double Bengals wideout pairing with Dalton and plug Boyd into the lineup, as we had a few dollars to spare on the original construction.WR Auden Tate, Bengals vs. Cardinals ($10). It also feels like the Bengals should put up a ton of points against Arizona, and so we’ll take the cheap Tate, too. Cincinnati has run three-wide a ton this year, and Tate should be heavily involved in the snaps. In a game where passing should work, that should translate to air production, too. WEEK 5 DFS LINEUPS:Y! cash | Y! GPP | FD cash | FD GPP | DK cash | DK GPPWR JuJu Smith-Schuster, Steelers vs. Ravens ($28). Getting JuJu for a slightly depressed price is never a bad option. The Ravens have been vulnerable against good receivers this year, so if Mason Rudolph has any success through the air in Week 5, it will be to Smith-Schuster.TE Zach Ertz, Eagles vs. Jets ($20). Ertz is the sixth highest-priced TE on the slate. There’s an argument to be made for Tyler Eifert against the Cardinals’ terrible TE defense, but that’s too chalky for a GPP so we went with the double Bengals’ WRs. Ertz is at a fair price point despite a statistically difficult matchup.last_img read more

HEFTY TWO-DAY PICK SIX CARRYOVER OF $167,771 INTO SATURDAY AT SANTA ANITA; TOTAL PICK SIX POOL COULD REACH $750,000

first_img–30– ARCADIA, Calif. (March 25, 2016)–There is a hefty two-day Pick Six carryover of $167,771 into Saturday at Santa Anita, and track officials estimate Saturday’s total Pick Six pool should approach $750,000.With a carryover from Thursday of $37,289 to shoot at, punters wagered $244,251 in “new money” on Friday, creating a total Pick Six pool of $281,540.Santa Anita will present an 11-race card on Saturday, with the Pick Six comprising races six through 11. Approximate post time for race six is at 3:05 p.m. PDT.For late changes and complete morning line information, fans are encouraged to visit santaanita.com.First post time on Saturday is at 12:30 p.m. Admission gates open at 10:30 a.m.last_img

On-farm cooperation facilitating OSC research and marketing efforts

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The research efforts of Ohio agriculture certainly include lab testing, university plot work and data analysis, but every farmer knows that the most dependable crop production research also includes extensive work in real, on-farm fields.The real world of crop production simply cannot be duplicated in a lab. For this reason, farmer cooperators with various agricultural research projects are absolutely essential in developing relevant conclusions and solutions for challenges on farms. And, it just so happens, that some of those farmer cooperators are the same ones making decisions about which research projects should be funded by Ohio Soybean Council (OSC) checkoff dollars at the state and national levels. Dan Corcoran, Pike County farmer, OSC and United Soybean Board memberWith its misty mornings, rolling hills and steamy river bottoms, the Corcoran farm faces perennial disease challenges — a nightmare for farm management but a dream come true for plant pathologists like Dr. Anne Dorrance with Ohio State University Extension.“In southern Ohio we have a blessing and curse that it gets foggy most every morning. That allows us to get some moisture in here when it is dry but we also get more disease issues. We run into disease pressure from the time we plant the seed through harvest,” Corcoran said. “Anne likes to evaluate what is going on in these fields so we can learn more about how to grow better soybeans. Whenever Anne comes down here she gets a big smile on her face because of the disease levels we have. Our disease is good for her and bad for me.”As much as he does not appreciate the disease problems, Corcoran does recognize the value of this kind of research both for his farm and the farms of other Ohio soybean farmers.“Her research looks at some unique disease scenarios which will provide important information to farmers in the region. We hear from a lot of companies selling fungicides alerting us to problems, but with this university work we can get unbiased, real data on what works and what does not,” he said. “Anne has put out plots for three or four years. We have graduate students doing studies out here from the time we plant through harvest. They get an idea of the plant cycle and disease problems. They can also get an early start on finding disease here. Then, Anne has the ability to work with many people in the state and around the country. Through that collaboration, those researchers are looking at multiple things to help us as producers better manage things to produce a better crop.”Learning from the research taking place on his farm, Corcoran has modified his management techniques to improve profitability.“Because we have these plots, we talk about putting fungicide on a little earlier. The plot work has really helped us evaluate fungicides. We have learned that it is tough to make fungicides pay on soybeans. We use genetic selection to get good disease resistance,” he said. “Charcoal rot is more prevalent in southern Ohio. You need high temperatures and in some years we are seeing it on our sandy soils. We start see plants start to wither. They go from beautiful green to dying out just like that. It is a grey fungus that grows up the stem and takes over the whole plant. Those zero yields really hurt your average.“We are also watching frogeye leaf spot closely this year. We occasionally see it really affecting the perimeter and we will hit the outsides of fields when it gets bad, especially in seed beans that we grow. We like to do test strips every year. We will try different timing of spraying, with and without insecticides. The soybeans do look pretty when you spray them but it doesn’t always show up in the yield. The later it gets in the season, the less likely we are to spray.” Terry McClure, Paulding County, OSC Board memberThere are few issues more pressing in Ohio agriculture than the countless questionsTerry McClureregarding water quality. McClure has opened up his farm to researchers to get some answers through on-farm, edge-of-field testing with water collection stations for surface and tile runoff.“You have to take time to do these kinds of things. There is nothing wrong with farmers taking a little time to try to learn more about what is happening in our fields,” McClure said. “This really started several years ago with a presentation from Kevin Elder from the Ohio Department of Agriculture about these water quality problems we were seeing. He kept saying, ‘We don’t know.’ That got to be unacceptable. For agriculture, not knowing is not an answer. Since then, it has really turned out to be a much bigger thing than anybody thought it would be.”The sampling equipment for the water collection sites around the state costs $1 million and it costs another $500,000 a year to collect the samples. The funding efforts got started with OSC, Ohio Corn Marketing Program and the Ohio Small Grains Marketing Program in an effort to gather information to help farmers better manage phosphorus (P) on their farms to improve economics and water quality.The project is still ongoing, but McClure said there are some clear lessons already coming from the data collected.“There are some early things the researchers have learned that have become obvious. If you apply P right ahead of a storm, it moves off the field. Some of this is about cementing the things we thought we knew. Small grains make a difference in the whole crop rotation and cover crops do too. I don’t think we have enough data to understand the placement and some of the smaller details yet but we need to learn more by trying different practices. This will give us clues about the many small changes of how we do the 4Rs,” McClure said. “We have made some changes already on our farm. Historically we would apply all of our P and K as a wheat starter for our full rotation. We have started breaking up our phosphate applications. We have continued to use cover crops as much as we can. Oats after wheat really works for us and we have been seeing some really nice things with the cereal rye.“I have been surprised at the interest that farmers have in this knowledge and the understanding that can be generated by this. They want to know if the things they’re being asked to do are really making a difference.”McClure said the information gathered from this year’s extreme weather pattern should be particularly interesting.“This year has been unprecedented. Since planting in the middle of April we have had just shy of 40 inches of rain,” McClure said on July 21. “It will be interesting to see what dynamics there are coming out of that kind of water flow. We have to have had more particulate matter loss with this. I think we will be able to learn a lot from this challenge. Who would have ever plugged this weather event into a model? This has to be a one in 200 kind of year. This is real.” Keith Kemp, Preble County farmer, OSC and United Soybean Board memberWhen it comes to improving Ohio soybean production, there is no better place than on-farm soybean fields to study management practices.Keith Kemp“There is tremendous value to doing things on Ohio farms for Ohio’s farmers. It gives us an edge because we have the research right here,” Kemp said. “ It is so valuable to do this on Ohio farms rather than through national projects. We are getting good results that can really be used in Ohio to make our soybean industry more profitable.”Plots on Kemp’s farm are set up for a wide variety of research projects.“Laura Lindsey from The Ohio State University and her team of researchers are looking at fungicides, insecticides, seed treatments, some biologicals, and they looked at gypsum last year. They are doing the fertility work with Steve Culman in the same plot and they have non-GMO varieties over there too,” Kemp said. “The plot is between four or five acres. Their plot work is very small, but they can get quite a bit of good information from that. It is fun to watch the plots grow and keep an eye on what is happening. Some things work and some things don’t and that is what we want to see.”Having the plots on the farm is convenient and of real interest for Kemp.“They do everything for the plots. All we do is supply the ground. They have their own planter and they harvest and put the beans in our truck,” Kemp said. “It is really valuable for us to see the new things out there and the end results. There are more plots than just here so you have some comparison from other parts of the state. You can see how the varieties perform out here, which is nice. These plots are so valuable because you have a third party out here doing this research and not a company.”And, with his perspective of the checkoff funding decisions at both the state and national levels, Kemp sees how these Ohio efforts can be leveraged with national funding.“It is nice that we have this data to take to the national level as well. The more of this kind of research we do, the more funding we can get from the national level,” he said. “That helps build the research infrastructure in our state. I am excited with where OSU Extension is now. We have some top caliber researchers for soybeans in Ohio. There is tremendous work being done and it ends up making soybean farmers more profitable. We are investing for our future with this.” Dale Profit, Van Wert County farmer, OSC and United Soybean Board memberDale ProfitMore of the world, most notably South America, is figuring out how to efficiently produce soybeans in a cost-effective manner. Rather than watching as the competitive advantage of soybean growers in the United States erodes away to foreign competitors, Profit is doing something about it.“We’ve all recognized that we are all in a worldwide situation raising soybeans. In the future, South America will probably be able to raise soybeans with less expense than we can. We have to look for a niche or a product that adds value to our soybeans and we need to start adapting to this philosophy,” he said. “Not all of us will be raising commodity beans in the future. There will still be commodity beans out there but there will also be some opportunities for the high oleic soybeans and other things that are in the development stage at the present time.”High oleic soybean varieties, including Plenish from DuPont Pioneer and Vistive Gold from Monsanto, offer farmers a unique opportunity to regain soybean oil market share they lost because of trans-fat labeling. Food customers have been clear that they would like to use soybean oil, but they need new properties that offer health advantages over products with trans-fats. To prove that they can meet the potential demand, farmers need to show that they can provide a consistent supply of high oleic oil.“A few years ago, we had been raising seed soybeans for DuPont Pioneer and I asked them if they were going to handle Plenish and they said, ‘yes.’ I asked to be on the list. They called me up when they were asking for acres and that is how I got started,” Profit said. “We have always looked at opportunities and once in a while they come up short but if you aren’t looking for opportunities they pass you by. It is always best if you are on the front end of an opportunity. We generally raise three different varieties of Plenish — medium, short and longer season. They have always been right in the middle of our production for three years now and there has not been a spread of very many bushels in between. We think they are very competitive and we are happy with what they are doing for us.”Profit sees high oleic soybeans as a potential solution to the competitive challenges of the future for Ohio soybean farmers.“Farmers are primarily interested in yield. If varieties are developed with traits that yield they will be adopted fairly quickly,” said. “As long as the yield is there and there is some premium, we can use those opportunities to increase or maintain our income.” Bill Bayliss, Logan County farmer, OSC Board memberWhile efforts in growing soybeans more efficiently and profitably are crucial moving forward, there is no point in growing them if they cannot be marketed at a profitable price. With this in mind, Ohio’s soybean farmers are regularly working to connect the buyers of Ohio soybeans with Ohio farms.“We are not only looking at how to increase yields but also how to move forward in the marketing area. We are looking at who our best customers are, what they want and how we can adjust and adapt what we are doing to better serve them,” Bayliss said. “The Asian customers are our biggest food grade customers. We have found that they really value face-to-face conversations. They want to see the actual farmers they are doing business with. That is important to them.”With this in mind, there have been stepped up efforts in recent years to get Ohio’s soybean farmers over to meet their Asian customers in person, and to bring those customers to Ohio soybean farms. These encounters serve to build important relationships and also provide clues about how to better serve purchasers of Ohio soybeans.“The different countries in Asia have different opinions on genetically modified crops. Some are very interested in GMO-free soybeans but others are not really concerned if they are GMO or not,” Bayliss said. “Ohio farmers are lucky because we have soil types and a climate that creates a particular texture for the food grade soybeans that is preferred by the Asian customers.”It is also important to consider the needs of domestic customers.“High oleic soybeans are one of our premier factors in marketing because of their ability to improve the health of fried foods,” Bayliss said. “We are really working extensively to better serve the people who are buying our soybeans and soy products because that is what will ultimately pay off down the road.”For much more on the soybean checkoff, visit the Soybean Rewards web page at http://www.soyohio.org/council/for-ohio-farmers/soybean-rewards/.last_img read more

Girl Eats Bug

first_imgNutritional value: off the chartsOur main animal protein sources are pigs, chickens, cows and fish, with each animal and cut of meat providing a unique nutritional profile. According to Daniella, the same is true in the insect world. The flavors vary incredibly from red ants to silk worm pupae to crickets to grasshoppers, and so does nutritional value.Per 100 grams of lean beef, you can get 27.4 grams of protein and 3.5 mg of iron. The same quantity of caterpillars would give you 28.2 grams of protein and 35.5 mg of iron, with little fat. Crickets offer 12.9 grams of protein, 5.5 grams of fat, 5.1 grams of carbs, and an incredible 75.8 mg of calcium. As you can see, it’s not just about protein, as people commonly think.According to Martin, athletes and body builders who eat “scientifically” are very predisposed to insects, because of the variety of nutritional value offered, and the fact that it’s packaged as a whole food, not just an isolated supplement. Efficiency at converting feed to foodInsects are much more efficient than other forms of livestock at converting food and water into edible body mass. Says Daniella, “Many commonly farmed insect species require several times less food, 100 times less land space, and 1,000 times less water than beef to create the same amount of food.” While cows spend a lot of their energy just staying warm, insects are ectotherms, or cold-blooded creatures. Insects contribute far fewer greenhouse gases like methane to the atmosphere than livestock do, and don’t require deforestation or other development. Cattle-farming, by contrast, is the cause of 70% of deforestation, according to common figures, and is a larger contributor to global warming than driving cars.Bugs require so little space that an insect farm can be started in a closet or an old 55-gallon drum, and insects can be raised on food that people throw away: leaves, food scraps, and bran, for example.While our common livestock are stressed out and made sick by factory-farming conditions, insects are accustomed to being raised in tight quarters, and can be farmed in great density without apparent stress. As ectotherms, they are killed by cold temperatures. Daniella puts insects she farms or traps into a jar in the freezer (saying a brief prayer, she notes), killing them. They then come out of the freezer and into the frying pan, oven, or wok.I stopped by the local outdoor outfitters today for a butterfly net — they didn’t have one, but they did sell me a finely meshed fishing net. While she’s visiting us, Daniella is hoping to use it to catch some local grasshoppers or crickets, which she says you can treat pretty much like shrimp. I am hoping to get over the “ew” factor. How about you?Update: I got over it. Sauteed, local grasshoppers are great! And waxmoth larvae make a great snack.Tristan Roberts is Editorial Director at BuildingGreen, Inc., in Brattleboro, Vermont, which publishes information on green building solutions.Note: I hope that GBA readers enjoyed this week’s jaunt away from the built environment. You can’t say you didn’t ask for it, AJ. (See my recent post on Utility Wind Energy: Bad News for Bears). Did we evolve to eat bugs?Daniella is convinced that this “cultural thing” goes against our nature: insects are “a deeply native food.” She asked, “If you think of primates using their first tools, what do you think of?” I thought of of chimps using sticks to get termites out of their nests, and then devour them. Daniella describes herself as someone with food issues — lactose-intolerant, allergic to alcohol, but she has never had a problem eating insects. “It feels from an organic level that we are biologically evolved to eat bugs,” she says.If you don’t feel that you were evolved to dip into some grubs, there are some other reasons why you might consider it. Introducing entomophagy: Eating insectsA growing number of people are trying to introduce a new concept, however: entomophagy, for entomo- (insects) plus -phagy (eat). Yes, they are suggesting that we should purposefully eat insects as food, and that there are good ethical, environmental, nutritional, and culinary reasons for doing so.I had the chance this week to talk with Daniella Martin, host of the website GirlMeetsBug.com, and a leading teacher and promoter of the topic. Although it’s difficult to know for sure, Daniella quotes a common estimate that 80% of the world practices insect-eating — and as a delicacy, not just “famine food.” Why, I asked her, are Americans so squeamish about something that is so commonly accepted elsewhere?“Every culture has its identity,” she told me. “For Muslims, not eating pork is part of their identity — for Hindus, not eating beef. For most Americans, by the time we are 9 or 10 years old we don’t even remember where we got the idea that bugs are gross. It’s simply part of our cultural identity to not eat bugs.” The Large Blue Butterfly, found in Europe, lays its eggs on a marsh gentian leaf. Its larva (a caterpillar) hatches and falls to the ground and emits a scent that smells to certain species of ant just like its own larvae. The ants carry the caterpillar back to their nest, where they not only care for it as one of their own, but as one of their own that is going to turn into a queen. Meanwhile, the caterpillar is eating the actual ant larvae and growing large.Enter the ichneumon wasp, which can somehow detect ant colonies that have been invaded in this way. The wasp flies into the ant colony and sprays a pheromone that causes the ants to attack each other. In the melee, the wasp finds the caterpillar in the larval chamber and injects its own eggs into the caterpillar. Those eggs later hatch during the butterfly’s chrysalis stage, consuming it from the inside and later coming forth as wasps.Interactions like these between ants and other species are so common that there is a word for them: myrmecophily.Interactions between Americans and insects are also very common, and are known by the following words: gross, EEW!, splat, and squish.last_img read more

4 days agoArsenal boss Emery fumes over Sokratis penalty call: Where was VAR?

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Arsenal boss Emery fumes over Sokratis penalty call: Where was VAR?by Freddie Taylor4 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveUnai Emery believes Arsenal were robbed of a clear penalty against Sheffield United on Monday night. The Blades won the match 1-0 thanks to a first-half strike from Lys Mousset.But Emery says the Gunners were unlucky not to have a chance to equalise from the penalty spot after Sokratis was fouled in the box.He told Sky Sports: “The scorer was with our goalkeeper and we had three players free to attack the ball. They gave us a key moment – the goal and another one when we should have had a clear penalty on Sokratis.”Bukayo Saka drives forward but I do not know if it was a penalty. It is a hard action for a yellow card. With VAR, the foul on Sokratis should have been reviewed. it was clear but we have to accept it.” last_img read more

Toronto stock index moves slightly lower US stock markets rise

first_imgThe Toronto Stock Exchange’s main index slipped slightly lower Monday, while markets south of the border inched forward after seeing some losses earlier in the day.The S&P/TSX composite index shed 13 points to 16,026.26.The indice’s performance is tied to geopolitical tensions, said Kash Pashootan, CEO and chief investment officer at First Avenue Investment Counsel.Ongoing trouble between the U.S. and North Korea, as well as other global political issues have led to concerns about an oil supply disruption, he said, driving the commodity price higher and creating a resource-rooted rally for the exchange.However, the price of oil didn’t move much Monday — with the December crude contract gaining two cents to US$56.76 per barrel — leaving the TSX relatively flat as well, Pashootan said.On Wall Street, indices continued to question whether U.S. President Donald Trump will deliver on promised reforms, like a corporate tax cut, Pashootan said, and indices dipped into the red.“But there’s no question that the underlying enthusiasm and appetite for buying equities continues to remain strong,” he said, adding that’s what lifted indices before markets closed.The Dow Jones industrial average gained 17.49 points to 23,439.70, the S&P 500 index rose 2.54 points to 2,584.84 and the Nasdaq composite index advanced 6.66 points to 6,757.60.Pashootan expects U.S. markets to show volatility over the next couple of quarters, moving higher when optimism about Trump’s reform grows and retreating at any sign of challenges in the president’s way.Elsewhere in commodities, the December gold contract rose US$4.70 to US$1,278.90 an ounce and the December copper contract advanced roughly four cents to about US$3.12 a pound. The December natural gas contract fell about five cents to roughly US$3.17 per mmBTU.The Bank of Canada, which publishes the daily average exchange rate of the Canadian dollar, is closed in lieu of Remembrance Day.By Aleksandra Sagan in Vancouver.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.last_img read more

OECD raises outlook for Canadian growth to 22 per cent this year

first_imgOTTAWA – The OECD is raising its economic forecast for Canada amid a strengthening global economy, but also warns that tensions are appearing that could threaten global growth.The Paris-based economic think-tank says trade protectionism remains a key risk that would negatively affect confidence, investment and jobs.The OECD comment follows moves by the U.S. to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from most countries in the world, with Canada and Mexico exempted.The OECD says it now expects the Canadian economy to grow 2.2 per cent this year, up from an earlier prediction of 2.1 per cent.It also raised its Canadian growth outlook for next year to 2.0 per cent compared with its forecast in November for 1.9 per cent.The OECD says the revised outlook compares with growth of 3.0 per cent last year in Canada.last_img read more

US China raise tariffs in new round of trade dispute

first_imgBEIJING, China – The United States and China went ahead with tariff hikes on billions of dollars of each other’s automobiles, factory machinery and other goods Thursday in an escalation of a battle over Beijing’s technology policy that companies worry will chill global economic growth.The increases came as envoys met in Washington for their first high-level talks in two months. They gave no sign of progress toward a settlement of U.S. complaints that Beijing steals technology and its industry development plans violate Chinese free-trade commitments.The 25 per cent duties, previously announced, apply to $16 billion of goods from each side including automobiles and metal scrap from the United States and Chinese-made factory machinery and electronic components.In the first round of tariff hikes, U.S. President Donald Trump imposed 25 per cent duties on $34 billion of Chinese imports on July 6. Beijing responded with similar penalties on the same amount of American goods.The Chinese government criticized Thursday’s U.S. increase as a violation of World Trade Organization rules and said it would file a legal challenge.A foreign ministry spokesman, Lu Kang, declined to give details of the Washington talks.“We hope the U.S. side will get along with us to strive for a good result from the talks with a reasonable and practical attitude,” Lu said.Beijing has rejected U.S. demands to scale back plans for state-led technology development that its trading partners say violate its market-opening commitments. American officials worry they might erode the United States’ industrial leadership.With no settlement in sight, economists warn the conflict could spread and knock up to 0.5 percentage points off global economic growth through 2020.The pressure on Chinese export industries that support millions of jobs adds to challenges for Communist leaders who are trying to shore up slowing economic growth.Factory output, consumer spending and other indicators were weaker than expected in July. Beijing has responded by pumping money into financial markets and announcing plans for higher spending on public works construction.Chinese leaders have promised to help struggling exporters and ordered banks to lend more freely to them. But they have avoided full-scale economic stimulus that would set back efforts to rein in surging debt and nurture self-sustaining growth supported by consumer spending.Forecasters say the impact of U.S. tariffs on China’s economy is small and manageable for now. Credit Suisse said this month that if Trump goes ahead with all threatened U.S. increases, the “worst case” outlook would cut China’s economic growth by 0.2 percentage points this year and 1.3 per cent in 2019.The International Monetary Fund’s growth forecast for China this year is 6.5 per cent, down from last year’s 6.8 per cent and more than double the U.S. forecast of 2.9 per cent.Ahead of the Washington talks, Chinese state TV mocked Trump with a sarcastic video posted on the YouTube and other social media pages of its international arm, China Global Television Network.“You are great,” says a presenter on the nearly three-minute English-language clip, reading a letter that pays a satirical tribute to Trump.“On behalf of doctors, thank you for pointing out the need to wean off American goods like bourbon and bacon,” the presenter says, referring to products on which China imposed retaliatory tariffs.The video appeared to have been removed Thursday from CGTN’s social media accounts.Trump has proposed another possible round of tariff hikes involving 25 per cent increases on an additional $200 billion of Chinese goods. Beijing issued a $60 billion list of American products for retaliation if Washington goes ahead with that.That smaller target list reflects the fact that Beijing is running out of American goods for retaliation due to their lopsided trade balance.China’s imports from the United States last year totalled about $130 billion. That leaves about $20 billion for penalties after tariffs already imposed or planned on a total of $110 billion.Chinese authorities have said they will take “comprehensive measures,” which companies worry could mean targeting operations of American businesses in China for disruption.last_img read more