Harrison destroyed by Price in first round

first_imgHeavyweight prospect David Price destroyed Audley Harrison in 82 seconds in their British and Commonwealth title clash at the Echo Arena in Liverpool.Harlesden’s former Olympic gold medallist, 40, was rocked by a left-right combination before being poleaxed by the unbeaten champion following a barrage of follow-up punches.Much criticised during his professional career, not least after meekly losing a one-sided world title fight against David Haye two years ago, Harrison had pledged to answer his critics this time.But the 6ft 8in Price – a bronze medallist at the 2008 Olympics – took charge straightaway.He sent Harrison staggering towards the ropes and then to the canvas after a couple of thunderous shots to the head, prompting the referee to stop the fight without bothering to count.Harrison said afterwards that he would take time to consider his future but is likely to retire from the sport.See also:DeGale wins to retain European titleHarrison leaves door open for returnHarrison plans to continue boxing careerAudley to begin Prizefighter against DaneHarrison announces return to the ringHarrison to face knockout specialist WilderFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Photos: Fans line up for free tickets to Stephen Curry’s party

first_imgClick here if you are having trouble viewing the photo gallery or video on your mobile device.A couple hundred Curry fans lined up outside the Golden State Warriors guard’s pop-up shop along Ninth Street in hopes of getting a pair of free tickets to a party Curry is throwing on Friday night at the Fox Theater.Curry invited fans on Tuesday night through his Instagram to the event, he said, was because “obviously it’s our last year playing in Oakland as a Warriors organization. This is a great …last_img

Continue to watch for ear rots

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt Hutcheson, Seed Consultants, Inc.In the past few weeks while making yield estimates and walking corn fields, it has become apparent that ear rots will be a concern this fall. Corn ear rots reduce corn yield, affect grain quality, and can lead to the development of mycotoxins in grain.Below are symptoms and toxin concerns for ear rots that may be present in corn fields this fall:• Aspergillus ear rot: Symptoms appear as an olive-green mold on corn kernels that usually occurs at the tip of the ear. Aspergillus ear rot produces aflatoxin which is toxic to livestock and considered a carcinogen as well.• Fusarium ear rot: Symptoms include white to pink colored mold on kernels. This mold can infect small areas of kernels on the ear or be scattered in a random patter across the ear. Fusarium ear rot sometimes occurs where insects have damaged kernels the ear. Fusarium ear rot produces mycotoxins which create a toxicity concern for both human and livestock consumption.• Gibberella ear rot: Symptoms include a pink mold that usually begins at the ear tip. Fusarium ear rot produces two toxins, including DON which is also referred to as vomitoxin. DON is toxic to livestock, especially hogs.• Diploidia ear rot: Symptoms include a thick white or gray colored mold that begins at the base of the corn ear.It is critical for corn growers to scout fields and determine if ear rots are present. Infected fields should be harvested and dried early, then segregated from grain not affected by ear rots. Adjust combines so lighter, damaged kernels will be sorted out and left in the field. Drying grain to below 15% moisture will prevent further development of ear rots.last_img read more

Girl Eats Bug

first_imgNutritional value: off the chartsOur main animal protein sources are pigs, chickens, cows and fish, with each animal and cut of meat providing a unique nutritional profile. According to Daniella, the same is true in the insect world. The flavors vary incredibly from red ants to silk worm pupae to crickets to grasshoppers, and so does nutritional value.Per 100 grams of lean beef, you can get 27.4 grams of protein and 3.5 mg of iron. The same quantity of caterpillars would give you 28.2 grams of protein and 35.5 mg of iron, with little fat. Crickets offer 12.9 grams of protein, 5.5 grams of fat, 5.1 grams of carbs, and an incredible 75.8 mg of calcium. As you can see, it’s not just about protein, as people commonly think.According to Martin, athletes and body builders who eat “scientifically” are very predisposed to insects, because of the variety of nutritional value offered, and the fact that it’s packaged as a whole food, not just an isolated supplement. Efficiency at converting feed to foodInsects are much more efficient than other forms of livestock at converting food and water into edible body mass. Says Daniella, “Many commonly farmed insect species require several times less food, 100 times less land space, and 1,000 times less water than beef to create the same amount of food.” While cows spend a lot of their energy just staying warm, insects are ectotherms, or cold-blooded creatures. Insects contribute far fewer greenhouse gases like methane to the atmosphere than livestock do, and don’t require deforestation or other development. Cattle-farming, by contrast, is the cause of 70% of deforestation, according to common figures, and is a larger contributor to global warming than driving cars.Bugs require so little space that an insect farm can be started in a closet or an old 55-gallon drum, and insects can be raised on food that people throw away: leaves, food scraps, and bran, for example.While our common livestock are stressed out and made sick by factory-farming conditions, insects are accustomed to being raised in tight quarters, and can be farmed in great density without apparent stress. As ectotherms, they are killed by cold temperatures. Daniella puts insects she farms or traps into a jar in the freezer (saying a brief prayer, she notes), killing them. They then come out of the freezer and into the frying pan, oven, or wok.I stopped by the local outdoor outfitters today for a butterfly net — they didn’t have one, but they did sell me a finely meshed fishing net. While she’s visiting us, Daniella is hoping to use it to catch some local grasshoppers or crickets, which she says you can treat pretty much like shrimp. I am hoping to get over the “ew” factor. How about you?Update: I got over it. Sauteed, local grasshoppers are great! And waxmoth larvae make a great snack.Tristan Roberts is Editorial Director at BuildingGreen, Inc., in Brattleboro, Vermont, which publishes information on green building solutions.Note: I hope that GBA readers enjoyed this week’s jaunt away from the built environment. You can’t say you didn’t ask for it, AJ. (See my recent post on Utility Wind Energy: Bad News for Bears). Did we evolve to eat bugs?Daniella is convinced that this “cultural thing” goes against our nature: insects are “a deeply native food.” She asked, “If you think of primates using their first tools, what do you think of?” I thought of of chimps using sticks to get termites out of their nests, and then devour them. Daniella describes herself as someone with food issues — lactose-intolerant, allergic to alcohol, but she has never had a problem eating insects. “It feels from an organic level that we are biologically evolved to eat bugs,” she says.If you don’t feel that you were evolved to dip into some grubs, there are some other reasons why you might consider it. Introducing entomophagy: Eating insectsA growing number of people are trying to introduce a new concept, however: entomophagy, for entomo- (insects) plus -phagy (eat). Yes, they are suggesting that we should purposefully eat insects as food, and that there are good ethical, environmental, nutritional, and culinary reasons for doing so.I had the chance this week to talk with Daniella Martin, host of the website GirlMeetsBug.com, and a leading teacher and promoter of the topic. Although it’s difficult to know for sure, Daniella quotes a common estimate that 80% of the world practices insect-eating — and as a delicacy, not just “famine food.” Why, I asked her, are Americans so squeamish about something that is so commonly accepted elsewhere?“Every culture has its identity,” she told me. “For Muslims, not eating pork is part of their identity — for Hindus, not eating beef. For most Americans, by the time we are 9 or 10 years old we don’t even remember where we got the idea that bugs are gross. It’s simply part of our cultural identity to not eat bugs.” The Large Blue Butterfly, found in Europe, lays its eggs on a marsh gentian leaf. Its larva (a caterpillar) hatches and falls to the ground and emits a scent that smells to certain species of ant just like its own larvae. The ants carry the caterpillar back to their nest, where they not only care for it as one of their own, but as one of their own that is going to turn into a queen. Meanwhile, the caterpillar is eating the actual ant larvae and growing large.Enter the ichneumon wasp, which can somehow detect ant colonies that have been invaded in this way. The wasp flies into the ant colony and sprays a pheromone that causes the ants to attack each other. In the melee, the wasp finds the caterpillar in the larval chamber and injects its own eggs into the caterpillar. Those eggs later hatch during the butterfly’s chrysalis stage, consuming it from the inside and later coming forth as wasps.Interactions like these between ants and other species are so common that there is a word for them: myrmecophily.Interactions between Americans and insects are also very common, and are known by the following words: gross, EEW!, splat, and squish.last_img read more

James Anderson and Ravindra Jadeja not guilty, what?

first_imgThere is a term called Pyrrhic victory, which means something achieved at a loss greater than the value of the win. But the ICC hit wicket is not one. It needs to be called something worse. The ICC decision on the Anderson-Jadeja spat is blind and STUPID justice.Here were two players who brought disrepute to the game by their crass behaviour. The Indian team had charged English pacer James Anderson with pushing Ravindra Jadeja on the second day of the first Test at Trent Bridge. Anderson was charged with a level 3 offence. The English countered the charge with their complaint that Jadeja threatened Anderson. Jadeja got a level 2 charge, which was cut to level 1 by match referee David Boon and which meant he will lose 50 per cent of his match fee. Boon did this before the 3rd Test began at Southampton.India got creamed here after the heady win at Lord’s and Anderson was the man of the match for his contribution with the ball. The BCCI had sought a re-hearing of the whole case in the hope of justice. They may have thought the might of the ICC, now under sidelined BCCI chief N. Srinivasan, would have punished Anderson and spared Jadeja the penalty. Anderson has been absolved, so has Jadeja. Some justice this, man. What seems to have been struck in the bargain is the mother of all compromises, farce is a cliche.last_img read more