Many charities ‘fail to meet expectations’ of wealthier donors

first_img  34 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Capital appeal Giving/Philanthropy Major gift Research / statistics Howard Lake | 15 May 2003 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Many charities ‘fail to meet expectations’ of wealthier donorscenter_img The study quotes last year’s study by the Institute for Public Policy Research into the attitudes of the affluent to philanthropy. “‘A Bit Rich?’ What the wealthy think about giving” reported that “What is striking is that there is little evidence of much thought being put into how much the rich and affluent give.” This week’s study is quite scathing of some of the charities’ fundraising capabilities. It reports that:Charities lack a strategic approach to fundraising and rely on amateurish practices that are rooted in the pastFundraising should be part of the responsibility of trustees and senior executives and not simply left to the professional fundraisersOpportunities for fundraising from major donors remain largely unrecognised and so projects lack appropriate leadership, methodologies and resourcesToo little commitment to identify, grow and harvest relationships with both individuals and organisationsMany donors want to become more involved in their chosen charities but are given very few opportunities to do soDonors can feel taken for granted and as a result either limit their giving or curtail it completelyThe study sets out a set of guidelines which are intended to help charities to adopt more professional and commercially appropriate processes.Hilary Browne-Wilkinson, director of the Institute for Philanthropy said; “Six per cent of people contribute some 60% of all monies donated to charities. Anything which can be done to improve the understanding of the needs and motivations of this important group can only be of help to the sector as a whole.”The study canvassed the responses of 31 people from 13 charities. It focused on wealthy people capable of giving more than £5,000.A full copy of the report can be viewed or downloaded from the Ansbacher web site at www.ansbacher.com, or the Institute for Philanthropy web site. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis A new study suggests that the high-handed attitude of many UK charities is losing them millions of pounds.“Managing Major Donors: how charities manage their relationships with major donors”, a study published yesterday jointly by the Institute for Philanthropy and the Ansbacher Group, has revealed that many of Britain’s charities are failing to meet or even understand the expectations of their wealthier donors. The insensitivity of some organisations could be costing them millions of pounds a year by deterring continued giving from existing donors.The study, conducted by independent market researcher Judie Lannon, is based on the results of a survey that set out to investigate how charities currently manage their major donors and to contribute towards the development of Best Practice guidelines to increase the success of future fundraising efforts from this vitally important group. Advertisementlast_img read more